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bitRAKE



Joined: 21 Jul 2003
Posts: 2914
Location: [RSP+8*5]
bitRAKE
Quote:
Bit Commitment Blues
by Mike Stay

You think I got zero knowledge,
But I know you done me wrong.
Just commit to me baby,
So's I can sing a happier song!
One bit of commitment,
That's all I really need,
So send me your hashed answer
And the random seed.

I got the bit commitment, bit commitment blues.
I got the (thump thump hmmm...) bit commitment blues.

I ain't oblivious, darlin',
And honey, I ain't blind.
Don't need sublim'nal channels
To read your cheatin' mind.
I'll share a secret with you:
I know you hand out a public key.
But why's it to the apartment
That you're sharin' with me?

I got the bit commitment, bit commitment blues.
I got the (thump thump hmmm...) bit commitment blues.

You say you love me, baby,
But you flirt with other guys.
You say you want me, honey,
But I see you wink your eye.
You say you need me, Alice,
Now forgive me if I sob;
You know my name is Charlie,
So quit hangin' out with Bob!

I got the bit commitment, bit commitment blues.
I got the (thump thump hmmm...) bit commitment blues.

_________________
¯\(°_o)/¯ unlicense.org
Post 07 Jan 2009, 06:59
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madmatt



Joined: 07 Oct 2003
Posts: 1045
Location: Michigan, USA
madmatt
This makes me nauseous. Crying or Very sad Laughing
Post 07 Jan 2009, 07:10
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Tomasz Grysztar
Assembly Artist


Joined: 16 Jun 2003
Posts: 7722
Location: Kraków, Poland
Tomasz Grysztar
Oh, by the title of the thread I really thought you wanted to talk about writing computer programs that would write poetry. Smile

Have you ever read "Cyberiad" by Stanisław Lem? Wink
Post 07 Jan 2009, 10:05
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guignol



Joined: 06 Dec 2008
Posts: 701
guignol
Tomasz Grysztar wrote:
Have you ever read "Cyberiad" by Stanisław Lem? Wink
Nie-nie-nie.. Solaris shall prevail!

Tomasz Grysztar wrote:
Oh, by the title of the thread I really thought you wanted to talk about writing computer programs that would write poetry. Smile
Yet admit, the poem is quite good, huh?
I almost hear the music...
Post 07 Jan 2009, 10:35
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MHajduk



Joined: 30 Mar 2006
Posts: 6034
Location: Poland
MHajduk
Tomasz Grysztar wrote:
Oh, by the title of the thread I really thought you wanted to talk about writing computer programs that would write poetry. Smile
Well, there exists so-called "PERL poetry" (correct PERL scripts which can be read as poems). Wink Here you have an example by -Silent11:
Code:
      #!/usr/bin/perl

      while (our $year, $is, $ending){
          my $wish, 2, @all_monks; @ISA, 
          "Merry Christmas" or "Happy Hanukkah" or "Whatever" for @all_monks
      ;
      }
      continue {
          2; join('me this', @$year) and
          bless \@all_monks, 'EveryWhere'; "With Season's Greetings";
      }

      until ('next year') { "-Silent11" }
    
Script was taken from http://www.perlmonks.org/index.pl?node=Perl%20Poetry (I only had to remove one '+' character from original to make this script valid). Wink
Post 07 Jan 2009, 11:56
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tom tobias



Joined: 09 Sep 2003
Posts: 1320
Location: usa
tom tobias
If we are to offer opinions on Lem, I find him very talented. I enjoyed Solaris.
If we are to comment on poetry, one of my favorite subjects, may I humbly object to the poem submitted as utterly worthless.
I agree with Tomasz, that the title deceived me, I too imagined that the program would understand the basic rules of poetry, i.e. RHYME, of which, the submitted example offers very little. I suggest instead that the algorithm must also demand iambic pentameter, so that we can compare the output of the program with many, MANY other poets of previous eras. Here's my own poem, written not long after I watched Lem's solaris, though, I readily confess, my poem has nothing whatsoever to do with Lem's elegant masterpiece. My ditty is entirely without merit, so I do not submit it with any apprehension regarding FASM forumers' anticipated universal disapproval.
Wink

Here is a description of the tomb of my hero, Dr. Norman Bethune the great internationalist fighter from Canada in ShiJiaZhuang, not far from the place of his death in HeBei prefecture.

My little sonnet was composed, at his grave site, in honor of him, and the thousands of others who gave their lives, that China might gain her proper independence.


Three Photographs Encircle His Tomb


The pale moon fading, signals sunrise soon.
A furtive raccoon scampers past a dune,
In response to the Loon's mournful tune,
Announcing our grave site visit this noon.

Naked torso minus his shirt maroon,
He typed not in gloom, but joy, as buffoon;
There resembled less artist, and more goon,
In YanAn on that warmest day in June.

Wintry snows on his clothes did not harpoon
His resolve. He sought not even a spoon,
Asking only to help the next to swoon.
World citizen, to all mankind a boon.

Still in repose, chiseled features rough hewn,
The gravestone reads Doctor Norman Bethune.


ShiJiaZhuang, May 2000.
Post 07 Jan 2009, 14:41
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HyperVista



Joined: 18 Apr 2005
Posts: 691
Location: Virginia, USA
HyperVista
Unnormalized Models


This is the recipe for this.
Random fields,
exponential models,
motivated from (turn

your head
and say natural language
processing

). Segmenting and
labeling sequences. A
framework

based on
conditional random fields
offering several

advantages over
hidden Markov models and
stochastic grammar.

(she was thin
I thought
not normal I
liked her segments
enough to fill
the universe with a 2-d
string)

Second, we derive an equivalence
between the well-known
technique of boosting and maximum
likelihood for exponential
models. The idea of
unnormalized models plays
a key role.

Richard P. Gabriel
Post 07 Jan 2009, 14:58
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MHajduk



Joined: 30 Mar 2006
Posts: 6034
Location: Poland
MHajduk
tom tobias wrote:
Three Photographs Encircle His Tomb


The pale moon fading, signals sunrise soon.
A furtive raccoon scampers past a dune,
In response to the Loon's mournful tune,
Announcing our grave site visit this noon.

Naked torso minus his shirt maroon,
He typed not in gloom, but joy, as buffoon;
There resembled less artist, and more goon,
In YanAn on that warmest day in June.

Wintry snows on his clothes did not harpoon
His resolve. He sought not even a spoon,
Asking only to help the next to swoon.
World citizen, to all mankind a boon.

Still in repose, chiseled features rough hewn,
The gravestone reads Doctor Norman Bethune.


ShiJiaZhuang, May 2000.
Your sonnet has a very unusual rhyme scheme (monorhyme) AAAA AAAA AAAA AA (every verse rimes with any other). Wink
Post 07 Jan 2009, 15:08
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Tomasz Grysztar
Assembly Artist


Joined: 16 Jun 2003
Posts: 7722
Location: Kraków, Poland
Tomasz Grysztar
I was asking about "Cyberiad", because it contains this story:
Elektrybałt Trurla (this is the original Polish version)

And here I found the English translation of it:
Trurl's Electronic Bard (PDF)
Enjoy!

BTW, I'm really impressed by the fact, that someone undertook the translation of it at all.
Post 07 Jan 2009, 15:56
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tom tobias



Joined: 09 Sep 2003
Posts: 1320
Location: usa
tom tobias
Tomasz wrote:
I was asking about "Cyberiad", because it contains this story:
Elektrybałt Trurla (this is the original Polish version)

And here I found the English translation of it:
Trurl's Electronic Bard (PDF) Enjoy!

In other words, this is not a translation of the whole of Cyberiade, or, at least, the portion available for downloading does not correspond to the entire text.
MHajduk wrote:
Your sonnet has a very unusual rhyme scheme (monorhyme) AAAA AAAA AAAA AA (every verse rimes with any other).

Yes, you are correct. A native speaker, reading the poem, would ask, yawn, so what? But, you are keenly aware of the phonemic differences, thus your accurate observation of the rhyming pattern is all the more prescient, in view of the incongruous spelling. The poem illustrates, I believe, my contention that English is unnecessarily difficult for non-native speakers to comprehend. The entirely dissimilar spelling of many of those words, (which rhyme when spoken,) is counterintuitive in view of their essentially identical phonemic traits.
Smile
I wish I could locate these three photographs referenced by the sonnet.
Post 07 Jan 2009, 18:54
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Tomasz Grysztar
Assembly Artist


Joined: 16 Jun 2003
Posts: 7722
Location: Kraków, Poland
Tomasz Grysztar
tom tobias wrote:
In other words, this is not a translation of the whole of Cyberiade, or, at least, the portion available for downloading does not correspond to the entire text.

Yes - I meant this is the translation of the story which I had in mind, not the whole "Cyberiad".
Post 08 Jan 2009, 09:46
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shoorick



Joined: 25 Feb 2005
Posts: 1605
Location: Ukraine
shoorick
1,2,3,4,5,6,7
50,40,89
12,15,16,11
80,30,45
Post 08 Jan 2009, 12:40
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tom tobias



Joined: 09 Sep 2003
Posts: 1320
Location: usa
tom tobias
I yield, shoorick.
Best I can come up with is Iskra 1902
Smile
Post 08 Jan 2009, 21:18
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bitRAKE



Joined: 21 Jul 2003
Posts: 2914
Location: [RSP+8*5]
bitRAKE
Interesting story Tomasz - will read the rest of it tonight.

http://homepages.cwi.nl/~tromp/cl/LC.pdf
Post 09 Jan 2009, 01:28
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tom tobias



Joined: 09 Sep 2003
Posts: 1320
Location: usa
tom tobias
Interesting link, bitRAKE, do you intend then, to suggest a role for shoorick's matrix, perhaps as a prefix free set to satisfy the Kraft inequality? But, forgive my ignorance, how is knowledge of the lambda calculus, or the Turing machine, for that matter, going to aid anyone in writing a program to compute de novo a sonnet presented in iambic pentameter as the output?
Question
Post 09 Jan 2009, 03:45
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bitRAKE



Joined: 21 Jul 2003
Posts: 2914
Location: [RSP+8*5]
bitRAKE


Last edited by bitRAKE on 11 Jan 2009, 04:08; edited 1 time in total
Post 09 Jan 2009, 04:18
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shoorick



Joined: 25 Feb 2005
Posts: 1605
Location: Ukraine
shoorick
tom tobias wrote:
Best I can come up with is Iskra 1902
Oh! you remind me these... eh... not very liked by us materials we were forced to study in the school Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy

_________________
UNICODE forever!
Post 09 Jan 2009, 05:47
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HyperVista



Joined: 18 Apr 2005
Posts: 691
Location: Virginia, USA
HyperVista
shoorick - can you confirm that one key aspect of your mathematical sonnet has something to do with the pattern that each line ends with a prime, except for the last line? And does summation play a role?
Post 09 Jan 2009, 17:40
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tom tobias



Joined: 09 Sep 2003
Posts: 1320
Location: usa
tom tobias
HyperVista wrote:

shoorick - can you confirm that one key aspect of your mathematical sonnet has something to do with the pattern that each line ends with a prime, except for the last line? And does summation play a role?
Gosh, this is real progress. Here I was thinking that shoorick was giving us some kind of algorithmic puzzle, solution to which underscored some dramatic new technique to program a poetry generator.
I see a couple of problems with your conclusion, HyperVista. First of all, a Sonnet, even in English, must have 14 lines, not four. Secondly, a Sonnet must have ten, not seven, or any other quantity of syllables. Is it possible that in Russian, the pronunciation of these same numbers does correspond to ten syllables per line?
I acknowledge though, having not realized that an English pronunciation of these numbers does rhyme, at least first and third lines.
I had been preoccupied with trying to deduce the hidden meaning behind the sequence, hence, my thought of "one step forward and two steps backward," the title of the famous essay by Lenin.
But, you are of course correct, HyperVista, and I am wrong. It is an arithmetic poem. I suppose. I had thought that the particular sequence itself had meaning, rather than the fact that the sound, when pronounced, emphasized alliteration on the first and third line terminations.
shoorick wrote:
...not very liked by us materials we were forced to study in the school
Ah. You would then have preferred to read perhaps, instead of the writings of Vladimir Lenin, revolutionary, martyr, and leader of the most important revolution in mankind's history, the literary output of the "Colonel of the Imperial Guard", as Nicholas II regarded himself?
Compared with Marx, Luxemburg, or Kolakowski, Lenin is very easy reading.....When I look about me, much of what Lenin wrote about remains accurate to this day....
Smile
Post 09 Jan 2009, 20:02
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HyperVista



Joined: 18 Apr 2005
Posts: 691
Location: Virginia, USA
HyperVista
tom - ah yes, it's not a sonnet ... (english literature was probably my least favorite subject, and as you have surmised, classes of which I paid little attention to ... ). I stand corrected.
I'm not convinced that it's an arithmetic poem and I certainly can be wrong, and anxious to hear from shoorick on a hint. I saw a rough iambic pentameter in the prime, prime, prime, not prime nature of his poem / limerick, whatever, and the rhyming of "seven" and "eleven".
I do believe there is a relationship / algorithm between the numbers preceding the ending number in each sequence and can't figure that one out, which is why I asked if summation has a role.
Post 10 Jan 2009, 00:30
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