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Index > Heap > Voltage stabilizer: "tick tick" - is it normal?

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OzzY



Joined: 19 Sep 2003
Posts: 1029
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OzzY
Is it normal for the voltage stabilzer to do a noise (tick tick)? Can it damage the computer?
Post 11 Nov 2008, 02:12
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revolution
When all else fails, read the source


Joined: 24 Aug 2004
Posts: 17269
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revolution
I suggest you ask the manufacturer/retailer.

Maybe it is a bomb!
Post 11 Nov 2008, 02:21
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LocoDelAssembly
Your code has a bug


Joined: 06 May 2005
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LocoDelAssembly
Quote:

Maybe it is a bomb!


Maybe? Which voltage stabilizer is not harmful for computers? Buy non-cheap PSUs instead!
Post 11 Nov 2008, 02:29
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shoorick



Joined: 25 Feb 2005
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shoorick
badly fixed coil may "ticks" - if it is, then nothing bad, just inconvenient Smile
my second pc p/unit twistle while in standby, so, i do turn it off with switch when unused Smile
Post 11 Nov 2008, 10:33
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Borsuc



Joined: 29 Dec 2005
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Location: Bucharest, Romania
Borsuc
Use an UPS (uninterruptible power supply) instead, or were you already using one. Mine doesn't tick at all, except when it runs in battery mode (no power).

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Post 11 Nov 2008, 14:14
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baldr



Joined: 19 Mar 2008
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baldr
OzzY,

Mechanical/electromechanical voltage stabilizers are supposed to make some noises. Former make it by driving autotransformer's contact handle, latter by switching of their relay network. There are also ferroresonance voltage stabilizers, their source of noise is bad coil fixture, as shoorick already said.

Borsuc,

Could your UPS handle 160VAC as an input, instead of 220? Wink
Post 11 Nov 2008, 19:38
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OzzY



Joined: 19 Sep 2003
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OzzY
BTW, the noise stopped.

It was only that they that the power source was unstable and the voltage stabilizer was actually stabilizing it, I think.

I could see the light flashing in my room from time to time too.
Post 12 Nov 2008, 14:37
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Borsuc



Joined: 29 Dec 2005
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Borsuc
baldr wrote:
Could your UPS handle 160VAC as an input, instead of 220? Wink
dunno I could use a "transformer" (or however it is called in english) to convert it beforehand Smile

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Post 13 Nov 2008, 17:00
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edfed



Joined: 20 Feb 2006
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edfed
the problem you meet is a stability problem.
it can happen in many cases, and result in what you've described.
tick... tick... tick...

feedback is dead or too slow.
if everything goes well in the computer even with tick tick, it is maybe a load problem, a variable load that will sink too much current at fixed intervals.
or change your capacitors at output, maybe they are dead, i doubt it is a coil problem, they do noise because their command is defectuous.
maybe the voltage stabilizer is dead.
Post 14 Nov 2008, 11:47
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Matrix



Joined: 04 Sep 2004
Posts: 1171
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Matrix
tick tick usually means discontinuous mode in switched mode power supplies, for example the output is not loaded, output capacitor is charged during the "tick" time, then it takes a rest, because the voltage is above set level. The sound is generated by magnetostriction of the -ferrite materials-, and/or coils- getting loose and moving by high current electromagnetic force.
Another problem may be output capacitors puffed, losing capacity, so the output filtering is not enough to maintain stability. (so simply substituting output capacitors will help)

though it is possible the switched mode power supply synchronizes to a noise coupled in from the high line, the HF filter should solve the problem, there are some cheap chinese power supplies that does not have low pass filtering at the input.
Post 25 Nov 2008, 12:22
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