flat assembler
Message board for the users of flat assembler.

Index > OS Construction > Sound Card and Ethernet Access?

Author
Thread Post new topic Reply to topic
rhyno_dagreat



Joined: 31 Jul 2006
Posts: 487
Location: Maryland, Unol Daleithiau
rhyno_dagreat
Does anyone know how I'd make a program to use the external speakers (I assume it's through a sound card) and how I'd program to use the ethernet port? I was wondering if there are generic I/O port numbers for those, and if so what are they and what are their functions? I want to add those into my OS, is why. Very Happy Thanks.
Post 24 Apr 2008, 21:39
View user's profile Send private message Reply with quote
edfed



Joined: 20 Feb 2006
Posts: 4240
Location: 2018
edfed
there are generic I/O.

i didn't develop for it for the moment, but i have a lot of knowledge about by reading a lot of tuts, sources, and docs

for the sound card, you first need to be ok with (u)DMA programming.
scanning the PCI bus will give you a list of connected peripherals. and refering to the specifications table of each peripherals, you can know the I/O, memory usage, etc..
after, there is the DMI pool data, a sort of structure in the bios that told you the I/O ports of mains peripherals, as USB,n, network, VGA adapter...

for the sound card, the I/O are frtequentlly the same. it is a little standard and for new sound cards, they can be accessed by programmabler I/O ports. you can choose the I/O port

for the network card, it needs the DMA and the PIO.
the network cards are mainly circular buffers, and the datas are organised internally as pages ( for NE2k ).
accessing a network card is not hthat hard, but accessing the virtual layers (TCP/IP, DSN, FTP ...) is.

then, good luck.


if you dev a network driver, i invite you to make a mirror of the card memory somewhere in the central RAM, refreshed by the IRQ, for easy access at any time.
the sound card will read in the central RAM, then, just set some pointers, updated by IRQ too. and all would goes well, and the best, many coders would be able to use your code "as is".

Very Happy
Post 24 Apr 2008, 22:25
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website Reply with quote
rhyno_dagreat



Joined: 31 Jul 2006
Posts: 487
Location: Maryland, Unol Daleithiau
rhyno_dagreat
That's really helpful so I know what I'm doing when I do it, thanks edfed!

But a list of the ports and their functions (and required data) for them would help tremendously. And maybe some info on DMA would be nice also.

If anyone has any tuts or docs you can point me to, I thank you greatly. And please don't tell me "Read The F*cking Manual", as I have looked and found no manuals.
Post 25 Apr 2008, 00:33
View user's profile Send private message Reply with quote
edfed



Joined: 20 Feb 2006
Posts: 4240
Location: 2018
edfed
goto http://www.osdev.org
section wiki/pci bus.

for DMA:
goto http://www.osdever.com/cotontail/ ... ho no! it is closed, and for sale. shit!
Code:
ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
                       INTRO TO DMA by Draeden of VLA
ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
    

    DMA means Direct Memory Access.  You probably already know where and
why you use it, so I'll skip right down to the dirty stuff.  This all 
should speak for it's self, so... Enjoy.

    Draeden /VLA

ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ

    To do a DMA transfer, you need to know a few things:

        1)  Address of the memory to access

        2)  Length of data to read/write

    This can all be put into a structure:
    
STRUC DMAInfo
    Page        db  ?
    Offset      dw  ?
    Length      dw  ?
ENDS

    Page is the highest 4 bits of the absolute 20 bit address of the memory
location.  Note that DMA transfers CANNOT cross 64k page boundries.
    
    The Length is actually LENGTH-1; sending in a 0 will move 1 byte,
sending a 0FFFFh will move 64k.

    ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
    ; IN: DX:AX = segment/offset address of memory area
    ;
    ;OUT: DH = Page (0-F)  (DL is destroyed)
    ;     AX = Offset
    ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
PROC MakePage
    push    bx

    mov     bl,dh
    shr     bl,4    ;isolate upper 4 bits of segment

    shl     dx,4    ;make segment into ABS address
    add     ax,dx   ;add the offset and put it in AX
    adc     bl,0    ;complete the addition

    mov     dh,bl   ;put the PAGE where it goes

    pop     bx      ; DH:AX is now the PAGE:OFFSET address
    ret
ENDP

ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
    Programming DMA channels 0 thru 3
ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
    There are 3 ports that are DMA channel specific:

        1) The Page register
        2) The DMA count (length) register
        3) The memory address (offset register)

    They are as follows:

DMACH   PAGE    ADDRESS  LENGTH
 
 0       87h       0       1

 1       83h       2       3

 2       81h       4       5

 3       82h       6       7

        
    And now some general registers:

 DMA Mask Register:  0Ah
ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
        bit 7 - 3 = 0  Reserved

            bit 2 = 0  clear mask
                  = 1  set mask

       bits 1 - 0 = 00 Select channel 0
                  = 01 select channel 1
                  = 10 select channel 2
                  = 11 select channel 3

       USE: You must set the mask of the channel before you
            can reprogram it.

 DMA Mode Register:  0Bh
ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
        bit 7 - 6 = 00 Demand mode
                  = 01 Signal mode
                  = 10 Block mode
                  = 11 Cascade mode

        bit 5 - 4 = 0  Reserved

        bit 3 - 2 = 00 Verify operation
                  = 01 Write operation
                  = 10 Read operation
                  = 11 Reserved

       bits 1 - 0 = 00 Select channel 0
                  = 01 select channel 1
                  = 10 select channel 2
                  = 11 select channel 3

       USE: Tell the DMAC what to do. Common modes are:

            48h (Read operation, Signal mode)
                Used to read data from host memory and send to whomever
                polls it.

            44h (Write operation, Signal mode)
                Used to write data taken from a device to memory.

DMA clear byte ptr:  0Ch
ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
       USE: Send a zero to reset the internal ptrs



    WHAT TO DO:
ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ

    1) Set the Mask bit for the channel

        mov     al,4
        add     al,[DMA_Channel]
        out     0ah,al

    2) Clear Byte Ptr

        sub     al,al
        out     0Ch,al

    3) Set the DMA transfer mode

        mov     al,48h                  ;MODE output (read)
        add     al,[DMA_Channel]
        out     0Bh,al

    4) Set the memory ADDRESS and LENGTH

        ;        AX = offset
        ;        CX = Length
        ;[DMA_Base] = port # of memory address
        
        mov     dx,[DMA_Base]
        out     dx,al                   ;send lower byte address
        mov     al,ah
        out     dx,al                   ;send high byte address

        inc     dl                  ;point to Count port
        mov     al,cl
        out     dx,al                   ;send low byte length
        mov     al,ch
        out     dx,al                   ;send high byte length

    5) Set the DMA page

        ; AL = Page

        mov     dx,[Dma_Page]
        out     dx,al                   ; write the Page

    6) Clear DMA mask bit

        mov     al,[byte DMA_Channel]
        out     0Ah,al                  ; port 0Ah, DMA-1 mask reg bit

    7) Program the other device that is going to use the DMA output/input


    ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
    ; This routine programs the DMAC for channels 0-3
    ;
    ; IN: [DMA_Channel], [DMAbaseAdd], [DMApageReg] must be setup
    ;       [DAMBaseAdd] =  Memory Address port
    ;
    ;     dh = mode
    ;     ax = address
    ;     cx = length  
    ;     dl = page
    ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
PROC Prog_DMA03 NEAR
        push    bx
        mov     bx,ax

        mov     al,4
        add     al,[DMA_Channel]
        out     0Ah,al          ; mask reg bit

        sub     al,al
        out     0Ch,al          ; clr byte ptr

        mov     al,dh
        add     al,[DMA_Channel]
        out     0Bh,al          ; set mode reg

        push    dx
        
        mov     dx,[DMAbaseAdd]
        mov     al,bl
        out     dx,al           ; set base address low
        mov     al,bh
        out     dx,al           ; set base address high

        inc     dx              ;point to length
        mov     al,cl
        out     dx,al           ; set length low
        mov     al,ch
        out     dx,al           ; set length high

        pop     dx

        mov     al,dl
        mov     dx,[DmaPageReg]
        out     dx,al           ; set DMA page reg

        mov     al,[DMA_Channel]
        out     0Ah,al          ; unmask (activate) dma channel
        pop     bx
        ret
ENDP

ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
    Programming DMA channels 4 thru 7
ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ

    Again, there are 3 ports that are DMA channel specific:

        1) The Page register
        2) The DMA count (length) register
        3) The memory address (offset register

    They are as follows:

DMACH   PAGE    ADDRESS  LENGTH
 
 4       8Fh      C0h      C2h  

 5       8Bh      C4h      C6h  

 6       89h      C8h      CAh  

 7       8Ah      CCh      CEh 


    And now some general registers:

 DMA Mask Register: 0D4h
ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
        bit 7 - 3 = 0  Reserved

            bit 2 = 0  clear mask
                  = 1  set mask

       bits 1 - 0 = 00 Select channel 4
                  = 01 select channel 5
                  = 10 select channel 6
                  = 11 select channel 7

       USE: You must set the mask of the channel before you
            can reprogram it.

 DMA Mode Register: 0D6h
ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
        bit 7 - 6 = 00 Demand mode
                  = 01 Signal mode
                  = 10 Block mode
                  = 11 Cascade mode

        bit 5 - 4 = 0  Reserved

        bit 3 - 2 = 00 Verify operation
                  = 01 Write operation
                  = 10 Read operation
                  = 11 Reserved

       bits 1 - 0 = 00 Select channel 4
                  = 01 select channel 5
                  = 10 select channel 6
                  = 11 select channel 7

       USE: Tell the DMAC what to do. Common modes are:

            48h (Read operation, Signal mode)
                Used to read data from host memory and send to whomever
                polls it.

            44h (Write operation, Signal mode)
                Used to write data taken from a device to memory.

DMA clear byte ptr: 0D8h
ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
       USE: Send a zero to reset the internal ptrs


    WHAT TO DO: (exactly the same thing, just different io PORTs)
ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ

    1) Set the Mask bit for the channel

        mov     al,[DMA_Channel]    ;because the DMA's are 4-7, bit #3
        out     0D4h,al             ; is already set

    2) Clear Byte Ptr

        sub     al,al
        out     0D8h,al

    3) Set the DMA transfer mode
        
        mov     al,[DMA_Channel]
        sub     al,4
        or      al,48h                  ;MODE output (read)
        out     0D6h,al

    4) Set the memory ADDRESS and LENGTH

        ;        AX = offset
        ;        CX = Length
        ;[DMA_Base] = port # of memory address
        
        mov     dx,[DMA_Base]
        out     dx,al                   ;send lower byte address
        mov     al,ah
        out     dx,al                   ;send high byte address

        add     dl,2                ;point to Count port (seperated by 2)
        mov     al,cl
        out     dx,al                   ;send low byte length
        mov     al,ch
        out     dx,al                   ;send high byte length

    5) Set the DMA page

        ; AL = Page

        mov     dx,[Dma_Page]
        out     dx,al                   ; write the Page

    6) Clear DMA mask bit

        mov     al,[byte DMA_Channel]
        and     al,00000011b
        out     0d4h,al                 ; port 0Ah, DMA-1 mask reg bit

    7) Program the other device that is going to use the DMA output/input


    ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
    ; This routine programs the DMAC for channels 4-7
    ;
    ; IN: [DMA_Channel], [DMAbaseAdd], [DMApageReg] must be setup
    ;       [DAMBaseAdd] =  Memory Address port
    ;
    ;     dh = mode
    ;     ax = address
    ;     cx = length  
    ;     dl = page
    ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
PROC Prog_DMA47 NEAR
        push    bx
        mov     bx,ax

        mov     al,[DMA_Channel]
        out     0D4h,al         ; mask reg bit

        sub     al,al
        out     0D8h,al         ; clr byte ptr

        mov     al,[DMA_Channel]
        sub     al,4
        add     al,dh
        out     0D6h,al         ; set mode reg

        push    dx

        mov     dx,[DMAbaseAdd]
        mov     al,bl
        out     dx,al           ; set base address low
        mov     al,bh
        out     dx,al           ; set base address high

        add     dl,2            ;point to length
        mov     al,cl
        out     dx,al           ; set length low
        mov     al,ch
        out     dx,al           ; set length high

        pop     dx

        mov     al,dl
        mov     dx,[DmaPageReg]
        out     dx,al           ; set DMA page reg

        mov     al,[DMA_Channel]
        and     al,00000011b
        out     0D4h,al         ; unmask (activate) dma channel
        pop     bx
        ret
ENDP

    ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
    ; This routine programs the DMAC for channels 0-7
    ;
    ; IN: [DMA_Channel], [DMAbaseAdd], [DMApageReg] must be setup
    ;       [DAMBaseAdd] =  Memory Address port
    ;
    ;     dh = mode
    ;     ax = address
    ;     cx = length  
    ;     dl = page
    ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
PROC Prog_DMA NEAR
        push    bx
        mov     bx,ax

        cmp     [DMA_Channel],4
        jb      @@DoDMA03

        mov     al,[DMA_Channel]
        out     0D4h,al         ; mask reg bit

        sub     al,al
        out     0D8h,al         ; clr byte ptr

        mov     al,[DMA_Channel]
        sub     al,4
        add     al,dh
        out     0D6h,al         ; set mode reg

        push    dx

        mov     dx,[DMAbaseAdd]
        mov     al,bl
        out     dx,al           ; set base address low
        mov     al,bh
        out     dx,al           ; set base address high

        add     dl,2            ;point to length
        mov     al,cl
        out     dx,al           ; set length low
        mov     al,ch
        out     dx,al           ; set length high

        pop     dx

        mov     al,dl
        mov     dx,[DmaPageReg]
        out     dx,al           ; set DMA page reg

        mov     al,[DMA_Channel]
        and     al,00000011b
        out     0D4h,al         ; unmask (activate) dma channel
        pop     bx
        ret

@@DoDMA03:
        mov     al,4
        add     al,[DMA_Channel]
        out     0Ah,al          ; mask reg bit

        sub     al,al
        out     0Ch,al          ; clr byte ptr

        mov     al,dh
        add     al,[DMA_Channel]
        out     0Bh,al          ; set mode reg

        push    dx
        
        mov     dx,[DMAbaseAdd]
        mov     al,bl
        out     dx,al           ; set base address low
        mov     al,bh
        out     dx,al           ; set base address high

        inc     dx              ;point to length
        mov     al,cl
        out     dx,al           ; set length low
        mov     al,ch
        out     dx,al           ; set length high

        pop     dx

        mov     al,dl
        mov     dx,[DmaPageReg]
        out     dx,al           ; set DMA page reg

        mov     al,[DMA_Channel]
        out     0Ah,al          ; unmask (activate) dma channel
        pop     bx
        ret
ENDP

    


and for SB:

Code:
                  ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
                  ³ Programming the SoundBlaster DSP ³
                  ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

                  Written for the PC-GPE by Mark Feldman
              e-mail address : u914097@student.canberra.edu.au
                               myndale@cairo.anu.edu.au

             ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
             ³      THIS FILE MAY NOT BE DISTRIBUTED     ³
             ³ SEPARATE TO THE ENTIRE PC-GPE COLLECTION. ³
             ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ


ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÂÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
³ Disclaimer ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

I assume no responsibility whatsoever for any effect that this file, the
information contained therein or the use thereof has on you, your sanity,
computer, spouse, children, pets or anything else related to you or your
existance. No warranty is provided nor implied with this information.

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÂÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
³ Introduction ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

The SoundBlaster is capable of both FM and digitised sounds. The FM wave
is fully Adlib compatible, so check the ADLIB.TXT file for info
on how to program it. This file will concentrate on recording and playback
of digital samples through the SoundBlaster CT-DSP 1321 chip.

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÂÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
³ The SoundBlaster DSP I/O Ports ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

The DSP (Digital Sound Processor) chip is programmed through 4 ports which
are determined by the SoundBlaster base address jumper setting:

                    RESET    2x6h

                READ DATA    2xAh

WRITE COMMAND/DATA output
WRITE BUFFER STATUS input    2xCh


           DATA AVAILABLE    2xEh

where x = 1 for base address jumper setting 210h
      x = 2 for base address jumper setting 220h
      .
      .
      x = 6 for base address jumper setting 260h


ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÂÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
³ Resetting the DSP ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

You have to reset the DSP before you program it. This is done with the
following procedure :

1) Write a 1 to the SoundBlaster RESET port (2x6h)
2) Wait for 3 micro-seconds
3) Write a 0 to the SoundBlaster RESET port (2x6h)
4) Read the byte from the DATA AVAILABLE (2xEh) port until bit 7 = 1
5) Poll for a ready byte (AAh) from the READ DATA port (2xAh). Before
   reading the READ DATA port it is avdvisable.

The DSP usually takes somewhere around 100 micro-seconds to reset itself.
If it fails to do within a reasonable time (say 200 micro-seconds) then
an error has occurred, possibly an incorrect I/O address is being used.

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÂÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
³ Writing to the DSP ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

A value can be written to the DSP with the following procedure :

1) Read the DSP's WRITE BUFFER STATUS port (2xCh) until bit 7 = 0
2) Write the value to the WRITE COMMAND/DATA port (2xCh)

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÂÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
³ Reading the DSP ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

A value can be read from the DSP with the following procedure :

1) Read the DSP's DATA AVAILABLE port (2xEh) until bit 7 = 1
2) Read the data from the READ DATA port (2xAh)

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÂÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
³ Turning the speaker on and controlling DMA ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

Speaker and DMA control are handled by writing one of the following bytes
to the DSP:

                     ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
                     ³ Value   Description     ³
                     ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´
                     ³ D0h    DMA Stop         ³
                     ³ D1h    Turn speaker on  ³
                     ³ D3h    Turn speaker off ³
                     ³ D4h    DMA Continue     ³
                     ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

DMA is discussed below. The DMA commands shown here can be used to pause
the sample during DMA playback playback.

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÂÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
³ Writing to the DAC ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

The DAC (Digital to Analog Converter) is the part of the card which converts
a sample number (ie 0 -> 255) to a sound level. To generate a square sound
wave at maximum volume (for example) you could alternate writing 0's and
255's to the DAC.

Programming the DAC in direct mode involves the main program setting the
DAC to a desired value. Only 8 bit DAC is available in direct mode. To set
the DAC level you write the value 10h to the DSP followed by the sample
number (0 -> 255). Note that no sound will be heard unless the speaker has
been turned on. In direct mode the main program is responsible for the
timing between samples, the DAC can output sound samples as fast as the
calling program can change it. Typically the timer interrupt is reprogrammed
and used to generate the timing required for a sample playback. Info on
programming the PIT chip can be found in the PIT.TXT file.

The DAC can also be programmed to accept values sent to it via the DMA
chip. Draeden has written an excellent article on programming the DMA chip
(see DMA_VLA.TXT) so only a brief example of it's use will be given here.
The important thing to remember is that the DMA chip cannot transfer data
which crosses between page breaks. If the data does cross page breaks then
it will have to be split up into several transfers, with one page per
transfer.

Setting the playback frequency for the DMA transfer is done by writing
the value 40h to the DSP followed by TIME_CONSTANT, where
TIME_CONSTANT = 256 - 1000000 / frequency

There are several types of DMA transfers available. The following table
lists them:

      ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
      ³DMA_TYPE_VALUE   Description             Frequency Range    ³
      ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´
      ³    14h          8 bit                   4KHz -> 23 KHz     ³
      ³    74h          4 bit ADPCM             4KHz -> 12 KHz     ³
      ³    75h          4 bit ADPCM with        4KHz -> 12 KHz     ³
      ³                 reference byte                             ³
      ³    76h          2.6 bit ADPCM           4KHz -> 13 KHz     ³
      ³    77h          2.6 bit ADPCM with      4KHz -> 13 KHz     ³
      ³                 reference byte                             ³
      ³    16h          2 bit ADPCM             4KHz -> 11 KHz     ³
      ³    17h          2 bit ADPCM with        4KHz -> 11 KHz     ³
      ³                 reference byte                             ³
      ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

ADPCM stands for Adaptive Pulse Code Modulation, a sound compression
technique where the difference between successive samples is stored rather
than their actual values. In the modes with reference bytes, the first
byte is the actual starting value. Having modes with and without reference
bytes means you can output successive blocks without the need for a
reference byte at the start of each one.

The procedure for doing a DMA transfer is as follows:

1) Load the sound data into memory
2) Set up the DMA chip for the tranfer
3) Set the DSP TIME_CONSTANT to the sampling rate
4) Write DMA_TYPE_VALUE value to the DSP
5) Write DATA_LENGTH to the DSP (2 bytes, LSB first) where
   DATA_LENGTH = number of bytes to send - 1

Note that the DMA chip must be programmed before the BSP.

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÂÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
³ Reading from the ADC ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

Reading samples from the ADC (Analog to Digital Converter) can also be
done in either direct or DMA mode.

To read a sample in direct mode write the value 20h to the DSP and then
read the value from the DSP. Simple as that!

To set up the DSP for a DMA transfer, follow this procedure :

1) Get a memory buffer ready to hold the sample
2) Set up the DMA chip for the transfer
3) Set the DSP TIME_CONSTANT to the sampling rate
4) Write the value 24h to the DSP
5) Write DATA_LENGTH to the DSP (2 bytes, LSB first) where
   DATA_LENGTH = number of bytes to read - 1

Note that the DMA chip must be programmed before the BSP.

DMA reads only support 8 bit mode, compressed modes are done by software and
stored in the voc file. I haven't tried to figure out how the compression is
done. If someone does figure it out I'd like to know about it!

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÂÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
³ Programming the DMA Chip ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

As mentioned before, Draeden has written a very good article on the dma
chip, but here is a brief run down on what you would need to do to program
the DMA channel 1 for the DSP in real mode:

1) Calculate the 20 bit address of the memory buffer you are using
   where Base Address = Segment * 16 + Offset
   eg 1234h:5678h = 179B8h
2) Send the value 05h to port 0Ah (mask off channel 1)
3) Send the value 00h to port 0Ch (clear the internal DMA flip/flop)
4) Send the value 49h to port 0Bh (for playback) or
                  45h to port 0Bh (for recording)
5) Write the LSB (bits 0 -> 7) of the 20 bit memory address to port 02h
6) Write the MSB (bits 8 -> 15) of the 20 bit memory address to ort 02h
7) Write the Page (bits 16 -> 19) of the 20 bit memory address to port 83h
8) Send the LSB of DATA_LENGTH to port 03h
9) Send the MSB of DATA_LENGTH to port 03h
10) Send the value 01h to port 0Ah (enable channel 1)

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÂÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
³ End of DMA Interrupt ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

When a DMA transfer is complete an interrupt is generated. The actual
interrupt number depends on the SoundBlaster card's IRQ jumper setting:

                         ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
                         ³ IRQ Jumper             ³
                         ³  Setting     Interrupt ³
                         ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´
                         ³    2            0Ah    ³
                         ³    3            0Bh    ³
                         ³    5            0Dh    ³
                         ³    7            0Fh    ³
                         ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

To service one of these interrupts you must perform these 3 tasks:

1) Acknowledge the DSP interrupt by reading the DATA AVAILABLE port (2xEh)
   once.
2) If there are more blocks to transfer then set them up
3) Output value 20h (EOI) to the interrupt controller port 20h

Of course, as with any hardware interrupt you must also leave the
state of the system (registers etc..) the way it was when the interrupt
was called.

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÂÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
³ A Simple DSP Pascal Unit ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

{

  DSP.PAS - A demo SoundBlaster DSP unit for real mode

  By Mark Feldman
}

Unit DSP;

Interface

{ ResetDSP returns true if reset was successful
  base should be 1 for base address 210h, 2 for 220h etc... }
function ResetDSP(base : word) : boolean;

{ Write DAC sets the speaker output level }
procedure WriteDAC(level : byte);

{ ReadDAC reads the microphone input level }
function ReadDAC : byte;

{ SpeakerOn connects the DAC to the speaker }
function SpeakerOn: byte;

{ SpeakerOff disconnects the DAC from the speaker,
  but does not affect the DAC operation }
function SpeakerOff: byte;

{ Functions to pause DMA playback }
procedure DMAStop;
procedure DMAContinue;

{ Playback plays a sample of a given size back at a given frequency using
  DMA channel 1. The sample must not cross a page boundry }
procedure Playback(sound : Pointer; size : word; frequency : word);

Implementation

Uses Crt;

var      DSP_RESET : word;
     DSP_READ_DATA : word;
    DSP_WRITE_DATA : word;
  DSP_WRITE_STATUS : word;
    DSP_DATA_AVAIL : word;

function ResetDSP(base : word) : boolean;
begin

  base := base * $10;

  { Calculate the port addresses }
  DSP_RESET := base + $206;
  DSP_READ_DATA := base + $20A;
  DSP_WRITE_DATA := base + $20C;
  DSP_WRITE_STATUS := base + $20C;
  DSP_DATA_AVAIL := base + $20E;

  { Reset the DSP, and give some nice long delays just to be safe }
  Port[DSP_RESET] := 1;
  Delay(10);
  Port[DSP_RESET] := 0;
  Delay(10);
  if (Port[DSP_DATA_AVAIL] And $80 = $80) And
     (Port[DSP_READ_DATA] = $AA) then
    ResetDSP := true
  else
    ResetDSP := false;
end;

procedure WriteDSP(value : byte);
begin
  while Port[DSP_WRITE_STATUS] And $80 <> 0 do;
  Port[DSP_WRITE_DATA] := value;
end;

function ReadDSP : byte;
begin
  while Port[DSP_DATA_AVAIL] and $80 = 0 do;
  ReadDSP := Port[DSP_READ_DATA];
end;

procedure WriteDAC(level : byte);
begin
  WriteDSP($10);
  WriteDSP(level);
end;

function ReadDAC : byte;
begin
  WriteDSP($20);
  ReadDAC := ReadDSP;
end;

function SpeakerOn: byte;
begin
  WriteDSP($D1);
end;

function SpeakerOff: byte;
begin
  WriteDSP($D3);
end;

procedure DMAContinue;
begin
  WriteDSP($D4);
end;

procedure DMAStop;
begin
  WriteDSP($D0);
end;

procedure Playback(sound : Pointer; size : word; frequency : word);
var time_constant : word;
     page, offset : word;
begin

  SpeakerOn;

  size := size - 1;

  { Set up the DMA chip }
  offset := Seg(sound^) Shl 4 + Ofs(sound^);
  page := (Seg(sound^) + Ofs(sound^) shr 4) shr 12;
  Port[$0A] := 5;
  Port[$0C] := 0;
  Port[$0B] := $49;
  Port[$02] := Lo(offset);
  Port[$02] := Hi(offset);
  Port[$83] := page;
  Port[$03] := Lo(size);
  Port[$03] := Hi(size);
  Port[$0A] := 1;

  { Set the playback frequency }
  time_constant := 256 - 1000000 div frequency;
  WriteDSP($40);
  WriteDSP(time_constant);

  { Set the playback type (8-bit) }
  WriteDSP($14);
  WriteDSP(Lo(size));
  WriteDSP(Hi(size));
end;

end.


ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÂÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
³ References ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

Title : The SoundBlaster Developpers Kit
Publishers : Creative Labs Inc
             Creative Technology PTE LTD

Title : Sound Blaster - The Official Book
Authors : Richard Heimlich, David M. Golden, Ivan Luk, Peter M. Ridge
Publishers : Osborne/McGraw Hill
ISBN : 0-07-881907-5

Some of the information in this file was either obtained from or verified
by the source code in a public domain library called SOUNDX by Peter
Sprenger. I haven't tried using his library yet (I don't have a C compiler
at the moment) but it looks very well done and contains numerous sound card
detection routines. Says Peter : "It would be nice, that when you make
something commercial with my routines, that you send me a copy of your
project or send me some bucks, just enough for pizza and coke to support my
night programming sessions. If you send me nothing, ok. But USE the stuff,
if you can need it!". Heh...a REAL programmer!

ftpsite: ftp.uwp.edu
directory: /pub/msdos/demos/programming/game-dev/source
filename: soundx.zip

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÂÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
³ Sound Familiar? ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

What the...why is there a faint glimmer of sunlight outside? HOLY $#!^!! It's
5:30am! I'm goin' to bed!

    


Very Happy
Post 25 Apr 2008, 00:49
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website Reply with quote
rhyno_dagreat



Joined: 31 Jul 2006
Posts: 487
Location: Maryland, Unol Daleithiau
rhyno_dagreat
Thanks edfed! I am actually there now, but what am I looking for in the Networking section? Ne2000? Very Happy
Post 25 Apr 2008, 01:17
View user's profile Send private message Reply with quote
DJ Mauretto



Joined: 14 Mar 2007
Posts: 464
Location: Rome,Italy
DJ Mauretto
Sound Cards : There is no Standard
Network Cards : There is no Standard

Note That you can develop a driver for it if you have datasheet of your
device but will work only on your pc Wink
Post 25 Apr 2008, 10:03
View user's profile Send private message Reply with quote
sakeniwefu



Joined: 23 Mar 2008
Posts: 29
sakeniwefu
Code:
             ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
             ³      THIS FILE MAY NOT BE DISTRIBUTED     ³
             ³ SEPARATE TO THE ENTIRE PC-GPE COLLECTION. ³
             ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ    

Yeah, ludicrous copyright infringement. Razz
Post 25 Apr 2008, 13:37
View user's profile Send private message Reply with quote
edfed



Joined: 20 Feb 2006
Posts: 4240
Location: 2018
edfed
Quote:
Yeah, ludicrous copyright infringement.


this doc is very old, and me too, i didn't obtain it with the PC GPE.

and this file is supposed to help, not to impose restrictions. i'm a rebel. all is free, open, and there are no benefits to impose restrictions.
the only benefits of restrictions are the M$ like ones, full businezzz, no respect of customers, etc etc ...
Post 25 Apr 2008, 14:10
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website Reply with quote
rhyno_dagreat



Joined: 31 Jul 2006
Posts: 487
Location: Maryland, Unol Daleithiau
rhyno_dagreat
DJ Mauretto wrote:
Sound Cards : There is no Standard
Network Cards : There is no Standard

Note That you can develop a driver for it if you have datasheet of your
device but will work only on your pc Wink


I have done some reading (and I should have known better from Dex's work), but there's Intel standards out now - the older standard (AC'97), and the newer one (HD Sound). From what I understand these are all backwards compatible with older SB cards to an extent (they'd need to be, otherwise sound on old DOS games wouldn't work sufficiently!) so there...

As far as the Networking Cards... I think there's another standard out for those, but I have to read further, unless Dex knows something else we don't know, again. Very Happy
Post 01 May 2008, 01:52
View user's profile Send private message Reply with quote
DJ Mauretto



Joined: 14 Mar 2007
Posts: 464
Location: Rome,Italy
DJ Mauretto
Hello Very Happy
AC'97 is standard also HD but only in theory ( and no compatible with SB).
You must to have in any case a datasheet of your codec , because 70% don't work in standard mode, more there are some diferrent bit in your PCI chipset not standard ( to enable AC'97 and so on). Try and let me know Wink In my PC I have Analog Device AD1985 AC'97 codec,i have datasheet of my codec ,note that neither original driver be able to play it Laughing
About Network Card definitely not standard , any chipset is different, only Realtek RTL 8139 is standard ,but is a old chipset ,in any case i have a wireless network (usb) and Audigy2 (Creative) audio chipset,therefore your driver never will work on my pc Rolling Eyes
Post 01 May 2008, 08:07
View user's profile Send private message Reply with quote
Dex4u



Joined: 08 Feb 2005
Posts: 1601
Location: web
Dex4u
This is one of the biggest problems a hobby OS Dev as, as in no standard and many drivers to write for, plus Co not releasing there data sheets.
Now to get round this the OS Dev needs to find which cards are the most popular.

Which include AC97 and RTL8139, but these are changing all the time, by the time you have most people may have moved on.
Take your statement that most are SB compatable, this is true, most are, but this is disabled on boot up and needs to be enabled, which is differant on the many cards out there (has D J Mauretto pointed out).

So the best thing you can do as a OS Dev is to 1. try to stick to common used cards like above and 2. make sure you have a good driver interface in your OS.
I may be biased, but i think that the driver interface in DexOS is the best hobby OS one, i have come across.
Post 01 May 2008, 15:37
View user's profile Send private message Reply with quote
edfed



Joined: 20 Feb 2006
Posts: 4240
Location: 2018
edfed
Quote:
I may be biased, but i think that the driver interface in DexOS is the best hobby OS one, i have come across.

you would be less biased if the "one of the best hobby OS one" statement is writen. saying "the best hobby OS one" show a lack of relativism, don't forget there are a lot of hobby OSes.
a lot...

but i agree on the fact that the driver interface you use is one of the best.
there are a lot of possible ways to handle peripherals.

driver interface:
Code:
irq handler
memory & registers mirror in RAM
link into file system
set of generic routines
    


with this we can obtain some good design.
Post 02 May 2008, 08:45
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website Reply with quote
Dex4u



Joined: 08 Feb 2005
Posts: 1601
Location: web
Dex4u
edfed wrote:
Quote:
I may be biased, but i think that the driver interface in DexOS is the best hobby OS one, i have come across.

you would be less biased if the "one of the best hobby OS one" statement is writen. saying "the best hobby OS one" show a lack of relativism, don't forget there are a lot of hobby OSes.
a lot...

but i agree on the fact that the driver interface you use is one of the best.
there are a lot of possible ways to handle peripherals.

But the statement "i have come across." means from the ones i have tryed, so there may be better hobby OS driver interfaces out there, that i have not tryed Wink .
Post 02 May 2008, 15:28
View user's profile Send private message Reply with quote
DOS386



Joined: 08 Dec 2006
Posts: 1901
DOS386
> this doc is very old, and me too

That's why your ISA SB docs are almost useless.

> From what I understand these are all backwards compatible with older SB cards

NO.

> to an extent (they'd need to be, otherwise sound on old DOS games wouldn't work

They aren't, and thus DOS games don't work anymore with them Sad
Post 02 May 2008, 18:36
View user's profile Send private message Reply with quote
rhyno_dagreat



Joined: 31 Jul 2006
Posts: 487
Location: Maryland, Unol Daleithiau
rhyno_dagreat
DOS386 wrote:
> this doc is very old, and me too

That's why your ISA SB docs are almost useless.

> From what I understand these are all backwards compatible with older SB cards

NO.

> to an extent (they'd need to be, otherwise sound on old DOS games wouldn't work

They aren't, and thus DOS games don't work anymore with them Sad


Then howcome I can play sound on some of these old computer games? (Relentless, Star Wars: Tie Fighter Collectors Edition, etc.)?
Post 05 May 2008, 05:13
View user's profile Send private message Reply with quote
edfed



Joined: 20 Feb 2006
Posts: 4240
Location: 2018
edfed
maybe, probably, certainly these games have a set of sound drivers limited to some cards.

a sound card driver is not so heavy, it can fit in less than 10Kbytes and old dos games fit in more than 1 Mbytes.
Post 05 May 2008, 11:49
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website Reply with quote
Display posts from previous:
Post new topic Reply to topic

Jump to:  


< Last Thread | Next Thread >
Forum Rules:
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Copyright © 1999-2020, Tomasz Grysztar. Also on YouTube, Twitter.

Website powered by rwasa.