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OzzY



Joined: 19 Sep 2003
Posts: 1029
Location: Everywhere
OzzY
Hi!
I've been using Xubuntu which is Ubuntu with XFCE window manager.
Today I just installed Enlightenment desktop environment and it's really cool!

So, I'm searching if the there's a small distro without GUI, but with good base and repository, so it's easy to download and install Enlightenment and the apps, but without having to remove XFCE and stuff I don't want.

No recompiling kernel and stuff, please!
I just want a good distro base without a GUI but with apt-get or something.

Or maybe it's probably easier to do what i'm doing: install Xubuntu and just install Enlightenment.

Post your opinion!
Thanks!
Post 30 Jun 2007, 17:13
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vid
Verbosity in development


Joined: 05 Sep 2003
Posts: 7105
Location: Slovakia
vid
I guess Debian is the right one for you
Post 30 Jun 2007, 17:32
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OzzY



Joined: 19 Sep 2003
Posts: 1029
Location: Everywhere
OzzY
Debian looks great. But as Ubuntu is based on Debian I'd rather stay with Ubuntu.
Ubuntu sure works for me.
But I'm testing other distros on this machine, so when my new PC arrives I'll already know exactly what distro i'll install.
If I don't find anything better I'll stay with Ubuntu.

I'll try some lightweight distros like: Zenwalk (based on slackware), Absolute Slackware (based on slackware), ZipSlack (based on Slackware that boots from FAT/MS-DOS partitions! Looks interesting!), and others.
Absolute ( http://www.pcbypaul.com/absolute/ ) looks like great light and good looking setup for Slackware. I'm going to try it.

Yes, I like light OS even on powerful machines. I think this is ASM programmer's blood to have the best performance out of the machine he's working on! Laughing

I've been thinking: I like how Ubuntu or Debian-based distros do the package management.

But I'd like to try some slack-based or slack itself.
Is Slackware too hard to install programs in it? What about configuration? Will I have to mess with text files only or are there configuration menus?

Sorry for such newbie questions. But I'm trying to find my path on Linux and learn more!
Thanks!
Post 30 Jun 2007, 18:31
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vid
Verbosity in development


Joined: 05 Sep 2003
Posts: 7105
Location: Slovakia
vid
if you want to mess with things a lot - Slackware
if you want to mess with everything comfortably - Gentoo
if you want to have everything working out of box, just install what you need - Debian
if you want OS with bunch of preinstalled stuff (GUI, etc..) - Ubuntu

I personally prefer Gentoo. Just by installing it you learn a lot about GNU/linux, and it's not too hard. Then, installing something is just one command, like "emerge xfce". (Almost) everything is recompiled on install, so you can easily leave out things you don't use from binaries.
Post 01 Jul 2007, 10:07
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OzzY



Joined: 19 Sep 2003
Posts: 1029
Location: Everywhere
OzzY
I need help configuring my ADSL connection.
I'm OK with Linux not configuring printer, etc. But an internet connection is the first thing that has to work, so I can get more help.

So, configuring ADSL on Debian-based distros is easy. I just do pppoeconf.
But I want to try Arch Linux.

I tried Slackware and couldn't configure my internet.

I really need help. I'll install Arch Linux, but I'm afraid of not getting the internet configured.
So, what files do I need to edit or do I just need to run some command?
My internet is not DHCP, but usually I just provide the login e and password and the provider will give me an IP.

Thanks
Post 01 Jul 2007, 21:50
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f0dder



Joined: 19 Feb 2004
Posts: 3170
Location: Denmark
f0dder
You could also check out http://www.archlinux.org/ - lots of choice and configurability, relatively small base package, doesn't need build-everything-from-source, and is easier to handle than slackware.

Oops, just realized you already mentioned arch.

Well, what kind of internet connection do you have? PPPoA, PPPoE? And how are you connected? (modem + router, or a modem connected directly to your box and a windows logon thingy, etc?)
Post 02 Jul 2007, 11:24
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OzzY



Joined: 19 Sep 2003
Posts: 1029
Location: Everywhere
OzzY
It's PPPoE. It's just putting the login and password on Windows and Debian-based distros and it's connected. It's a bridge connection (no DHCP). The provider gives me an dynamic IP on connection.

Although last time I tried pppoe-setup on Slackware it didn't connected.
That's why I'm afraid of trying something not debian or ubuntu.
I'd like to try Arch as it seems perfect for me. But I really need to know how to configure my internet before I install it.
Post 02 Jul 2007, 15:48
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f0dder



Joined: 19 Feb 2004
Posts: 3170
Location: Denmark
f0dder
I've had very mixed results with pppoe on linux, but that was years ago. First, roaring-penguin didn't work, but I managed to get kernel-mode PPPoE working, which did turn out to work very well (and I used my linux server box as a router then too). After a kernel upgrade everything b0rked, but I managed to get roaring-penguin working, although it was slightly flaky.

Ended up going back to the also slightly flaky hardware router, until I bought a neatgear box which has worked perfectly 24/7 for several years (well, it has needed a few reboots after bad cases of thunder Smile).
Post 02 Jul 2007, 15:53
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LocoDelAssembly
Your code has a bug


Joined: 06 May 2005
Posts: 4633
Location: Argentina
LocoDelAssembly
BTW, someone could install Gentoo 2007.0 for amd64? I've just tried but the GTK version gets stuck after unpacking 50 packages and the text version crashes because it can't access some /mnt/gentoo/etc files (because there is no etc directory at all!!). The last time I tried Gentoo it installed perfectly but didn't work server X later (possibly my fault for not configuring anything), but now even I can't be able to at least get it installed Confused

I found the installer system not very good actually, for example, you can't make partitions, look if you like your layout and then write the modifications because any modification is applied inmediately...

This distro never let me you it :'(
Post 02 Jul 2007, 16:15
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vid
Verbosity in development


Joined: 05 Sep 2003
Posts: 7105
Location: Slovakia
vid
Don't use gentoo installer. Everyone i know says it sucks, and using installer also kinda defeats purpose of Gentoo. There is excellent Gentoo Installation Handbook, go on and install it yourself. It's invaluable experience.
Post 02 Jul 2007, 16:42
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LocoDelAssembly
Your code has a bug


Joined: 06 May 2005
Posts: 4633
Location: Argentina
LocoDelAssembly
FUCK! I failed to follow the RTFM rule!!

Well, I'm going to enjoy the invaluable experience then Smile

Thanks vid
Post 02 Jul 2007, 17:23
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vid
Verbosity in development


Joined: 05 Sep 2003
Posts: 7105
Location: Slovakia
vid
you won't feel so thankful after 10th kernel recompilation Wink
but it's worth of it, you're welcome
Post 02 Jul 2007, 17:36
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rugxulo



Joined: 09 Aug 2005
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Location: Usono (aka, USA)
rugxulo
How long does it take (approximately) to compile a Linux kernel these days?
Post 02 Jul 2007, 23:06
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vid
Verbosity in development


Joined: 05 Sep 2003
Posts: 7105
Location: Slovakia
vid
took me less than 30 minutes i think... but my 512 MB wasn't enough to recompile it from live CD, i had to create swap :/
Post 02 Jul 2007, 23:13
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rugxulo



Joined: 09 Aug 2005
Posts: 2341
Location: Usono (aka, USA)
rugxulo
Yuck, it needs more than 1/2 GB of RAM to compile?! Ugh. (Maybe you were running too many background things like X11?)

What type of PC did you compile on? (e.g. AMD64x2 is probably too fast to accurately test how long it takes to compile on a "normal" machine like a PII or PIII or whatever). Anyone else tried recently? I heard FreeBSD takes about half an hour too. (FreeDOS is much more limited in its kernel, so obviously it doesn't take as long: less than a minute even on my old P166 w/ cache loaded).
Post 03 Jul 2007, 00:09
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DOS386



Joined: 08 Dec 2006
Posts: 1901
DOS386
> How long does it take (approximately) to compile a Linux kernel these days?

DexOS kernel compiles for me in less than 1 second Shocked

_________________
Bug Nr.: 12345

Title: Hello World program compiles to 100 KB !!!

Status: Closed: NOT a Bug
Post 03 Jul 2007, 00:13
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rugxulo



Joined: 09 Aug 2005
Posts: 2341
Location: Usono (aka, USA)
rugxulo
Yes, anything written in assembly will assemble much faster (esp. with FASM) than GCC (chug chug, heh). It's apples and oranges. OctaOS reassembles very quickly too, in under a minute (I forget exactly how long).
Post 03 Jul 2007, 00:16
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vid
Verbosity in development


Joined: 05 Sep 2003
Posts: 7105
Location: Slovakia
vid
rugxulo: i just realized i was running it from VMware... i hope this explains few things Smile

but still, it's slow. And it's way worse when you recompile x server Wink
Post 03 Jul 2007, 00:35
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LocoDelAssembly
Your code has a bug


Joined: 06 May 2005
Posts: 4633
Location: Argentina
LocoDelAssembly
I tested under Debian amd64 version many times with an Athlon64 2.0 GHz and yes, it takes between 20 and 30 minutes to compile. After the first time it compiles much faster if you change the config but keep the object files.
Post 03 Jul 2007, 00:42
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f0dder



Joined: 19 Feb 2004
Posts: 3170
Location: Denmark
f0dder
It doesn't take too long to compile a kernel on recent hardware (on my old 486dx4-100 it took a couple hours iirc, though). Building a distro, which is what you do with a full gentoo setup, is a completely different matter though, it's much more than just the kernel.
Post 03 Jul 2007, 09:27
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