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Index > DOS > Idea for 16-bit ASM QuickSheet

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rhyno_dagreat



Joined: 31 Jul 2006
Posts: 487
Location: Maryland, Unol Daleithiau
rhyno_dagreat
Hey y'all, I'd like to create a 16-bit ASM quicksheet (maybe 3-4 pages long). What I'd like on it is:

  • An explaination of register names and uses. (i.e. - "SI = Source Index")
  • Some of the most used BIOS Interrupts.
  • Some of the most used DOS Interrupts.
  • An explaination of loadable memory addresses, and segments and offsets.
  • ORG headers and file endings - including bootable ones for 16-bit OS stuff.
  • An explaination of some of the least rememberd ASM opcodes.

If anyone has any ideas or feels like they could help, please reply. It would be good for beginners and for those who need a review or just plain forget something - so in turn it's usable by everyone.

In fact, I'd like everyone's input to help me compile a list of most used Interrupts. That way it's not from just my standpoint.


Last edited by rhyno_dagreat on 12 Oct 2006, 03:06; edited 1 time in total
Post 11 Oct 2006, 20:34
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Remy Vincent



Joined: 16 Sep 2005
Posts: 155
Location: France
Remy Vincent
rhyno_dagreat wrote:
Hey y'all,... I'd like to create a 16-bit ASM quicksheet...

In fact, I'd like everyone's input to help me compile a list of most used Interrupts. That way it's not from just my standpoint.



YOU NEED SOMTHING VERY HARD TO DO.. Appart from the existing web sites and books, I don't know someone or even a big team is able to write such precise data..
Post 11 Oct 2006, 20:57
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Remy Vincent



Joined: 16 Sep 2005
Posts: 155
Location: France
Remy Vincent
Remy Vincent wrote:

YOU NEED SOMTHING VERY HARD TO DO...


May I suggest you some psychological TRICK :
- If very rich people could spend holidays in the Moon, they would be only having "REAL" fun, But they would not be able to at all to repair their "Moon Holiday Base"... Then, the damages done to the Base could'nt be repaired by "ANY" technicians coming from earth, because their technical level would be too low... THEN... To repair our "Moon Holiday Base", we would need to create a "Mars Technical Base", because all people livng there would be serious enough to repair any damage done to the "Moon Holiday Base".

SO that is my suggestion, to create a "16-bit ASM quicksheet.." you need to pay people that IN THEIR MIND, live inside a very serious and structured "Mars Technical Base" helping and repairing a Moon Holiday Base... For example, personally, IN MY MIND, I live inside a "Pluto Planet Base", and that is what gives me my faith and my desire to achieve projects!

Good luck with your "16-bit ASM quicksheet (maybe 3-4 pages long)."
Post 11 Oct 2006, 21:10
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rhyno_dagreat



Joined: 31 Jul 2006
Posts: 487
Location: Maryland, Unol Daleithiau
rhyno_dagreat
All I was asking for is what do you think some of the most used interrupts are there for DOS and the BIOS.
Post 11 Oct 2006, 23:12
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rugxulo



Joined: 09 Aug 2005
Posts: 2341
Location: Usono (aka, USA)
rugxulo
rhyno_dagreat wrote:
Hey y'all, I'd like to create a 16-bit ASM quicksheet (maybe 3-4 pages long).

<snip>

If anyone has any ideas or feels like they could help, please reply.


First of all, you forgot the
Code:
[*]    
in your phpBB list (before each item)!

Secondly, here's my quick/rough answers (pardon any omissions/errors!):

    Registers:
  • AX = accumulator (MUL, DIV, CBW, CWD, LODSB, STOSB, SCASB, return code, interrupt function)
  • BX = base (XLAT, effective addresses)
  • CX = count (JCXZ, LOOP, REP .....)
  • DX = data (MUL, DIV, CWD)
  • SI = source (LODSB, MOVSB, CMPSB)
  • DI = destination (STOSB, MOVSB, CMPSB)
  • BP = base pointer (stack frames, other general use)
  • SP = stack pointer (ENTER, LEAVE, PUSH, POP)
  • CS = code segment (JMP, CALL, instruction offsets)
  • DS = data segment (LDS, string instructions, indirect memory references)
  • ES = extra segment (LES, string instructions)
  • SS = stack segment (LSS, PUSH, POP, CALL, etc.)
  • IP (not really a reg) = instruction pointer (i.e., current location)


DOS (int 20h; int 21h: 1,2,8,9,A,B,19,1A,2A,2C,30,3306,3C,3D,3E,3F,40,41,47,4C,4E,4F,55,60,etc.; int 29h; int 2Fh, 1A)
BIOS (int 10h: 0,E,F,1103,etc.; int 16h: 0,1,2,3,5)

See Ralf Brown's Interrupt List for more info.

Rare instructions? Such as what, DAS, LAHF, JO? NGASM (8086 DOS assembler) has a manual claiming to explain every 8086 instruction, so check that out.
Post 12 Oct 2006, 01:51
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rhyno_dagreat



Joined: 31 Jul 2006
Posts: 487
Location: Maryland, Unol Daleithiau
rhyno_dagreat
Thanks! I will be sure to include that. I'm gonna start on the quicksheet as soon as I get a chance! Does anyone know how I can make a PDF file though? I'd like to post it online here as a PDF when I get it finished.
Post 12 Oct 2006, 02:23
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