flat assembler
Message board for the users of flat assembler.

Index > Unix > M1 processor performance versus x86

Author
Thread Post new topic Reply to topic
donn



Joined: 05 Mar 2010
Posts: 205
donn
Hearing reports the M1 processor is faster in single thread performance than x86 single thread performance.

Is this unanimously true? Are there benchmarks similar to Geekbench, Cinebench that contest this or do not lean unfavorably to either side?


(Edited: single core->single thread)
Post 08 Dec 2020, 19:53
View user's profile Send private message Reply with quote
revolution
When all else fails, read the source


Joined: 24 Aug 2004
Posts: 17942
Location: In your JS exploiting you and your system
revolution
Link?
Post 08 Dec 2020, 22:25
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website Reply with quote
donn



Joined: 05 Mar 2010
Posts: 205
donn
https://www.anandtech.com/show/16252/mac-mini-apple-m1-tested for starters, word's really getting around.
Post 08 Dec 2020, 23:05
View user's profile Send private message Reply with quote
Furs



Joined: 04 Mar 2016
Posts: 1577
Furs
What 5nm x86 CPU did they compare with?
Post 10 Dec 2020, 14:09
View user's profile Send private message Reply with quote
donn



Joined: 05 Mar 2010
Posts: 205
donn
Screenshot from first link. Looks like it beats AMD Ryzen 9 5950X there. I'm told AMD is 7nm, not sure...

More broadly, from here: https://www.anandtech.com/show/16226/apple-silicon-m1-a14-deep-dive

Quote:
The new CPU core is what Apple claims to be the world’s fastest. This is going to be a centre-point of today’s article as we dive deeper into the microarchitecture of the Firestorm cores, as well look at the performance figures of the very similar Apple A14 SoC.

With its additional cache, we expect the Firestorm cores used in the M1 to be even faster than what we’re going to be dissecting today with the A14, so Apple’s claim of having the fastest CPU core in the world seems extremely plausible.


Description:
Filesize: 12.76 KB
Viewed: 951 Time(s)

fastestcore.jpg


Description:
Filesize: 58.04 KB
Viewed: 951 Time(s)

Benchmarks1.jpg


Post 10 Dec 2020, 23:18
View user's profile Send private message Reply with quote
revolution
When all else fails, read the source


Joined: 24 Aug 2004
Posts: 17942
Location: In your JS exploiting you and your system
revolution
Certainly single thread performance is important as a lot of code (and coders) don't know how to use threads.

But it's Apple, so that means no one can buy the chip to make a system. You have to buy the system from Apple, no one else. And the whole thing will be locked down tightly.

So I am sceptical. Performance is one thing, being able to use it without asking for Apple's permission is entirely another.
Post 10 Dec 2020, 23:37
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website Reply with quote
Melissa



Joined: 12 Apr 2012
Posts: 82
Melissa
Do we have code for geekbench? I heard it favors ram speed.
Post 13 Dec 2020, 11:55
View user's profile Send private message Reply with quote
Furs



Joined: 04 Mar 2016
Posts: 1577
Furs
Yeah and 5nm vs 7nm (both TSMC) gives more raw transistors which is why M1 can afford such a large cache.
Post 13 Dec 2020, 15:32
View user's profile Send private message Reply with quote
donn



Joined: 05 Mar 2010
Posts: 205
donn
I can't see any information on how the benchmark works from their website..

I found some discussion on it here, here however:
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=20165254

Quote:
Geekbench exposes some strange behaviour around the memory allocator under Windows. On systems with more than 8 cores Geekbench spends a significant chunk of time in the memory allocator due to contention. This issue (at least to this degree) isn't present on Linux, so that's why Epyc scores are much higher on Linux than Windows.


It's been around a while, maybe some are gleaming how it works indirectly, just by observing results over time.

Also, this is exactly what I was looking for, which backs up the 5nm debate:
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=25257932

Quote:
The i7-1165G7 is within 20% on single core performance of the M1. The Ryzen 4800U is within 20% on multi-core performance. Both are sustained ~25W parts similar to the M1. If you turned x64 SMT/AVX2 off, normalized for cores (Intel/AMD 4/8 vs Apple 4+4), on-die cache (Intel/AMD 12M L2+L3 vs Apple 32MB L2+L3) and frequency (Apple 3.2 vs AMD/Intel 4.2/4.7), you'd likely get very close results on 5nm or 7nm-equivalent same process. Zen 3 2666 vs 3200 RAM alone is about a 10% difference. The M1 is 4266 RAM IIRC.
Post 16 Dec 2020, 02:18
View user's profile Send private message Reply with quote
Display posts from previous:
Post new topic Reply to topic

Jump to:  


< Last Thread | Next Thread >
Forum Rules:
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Copyright © 1999-2020, Tomasz Grysztar. Also on GitHub, YouTube, Twitter.

Website powered by rwasa.