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MHajduk



Joined: 30 Mar 2006
Posts: 6038
Location: Poland
MHajduk
A group of Rudbeckias.

Image
Post 29 Jun 2016, 21:08
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bitRAKE



Joined: 21 Jul 2003
Posts: 2940
Location: vpcmipstrm
bitRAKE
MHajduk, I have taken pictures of many similar species as yours in my FB album of flowers. Composition and balance has been my main concern, while getting a good sampling of the diversity in the area. Many times the blooms are quite ravished by insects or weather. So, it is quite joyous to catch them at the right time. Much of the same can be said for mushrooms and fungi.

Sometimes the camera is not at the ready, and all we have is our memory and a desire to be present for future opportunities. One instance was a clear day on the warf: sun was high in the sky, and swirls of sardines glistened in the clear water. Their movements were like snakes in a tight circle. In a moment, Medusa rose from the deep and faded away.
Post 30 Jun 2016, 00:10
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YONG



Joined: 16 Mar 2005
Posts: 8000
Location: 22° 15' N | 114° 10' E
YONG
bitRAKE wrote:
I am taking pictures daily almost. None of my panoramas have been too great, but I'm working on it. Also playing a little with time lapse app.

Shared Album:

https://goo.gl/photos/rjosoPVz4kycR4pw6

(I think the high res originals can be downloaded?)
Nice photos. I quite like those involving stones, which remind me of Stonehenge:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stonehenge

Wink
Post 30 Jun 2016, 03:01
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YONG



Joined: 16 Mar 2005
Posts: 8000
Location: 22° 15' N | 114° 10' E
YONG
Enko wrote:
MHajduk wrote:


I have thought that the stamens of that flower could be also compared to cobras' heads. Wink

Scorpion Tails? Laughing Cool
Cobras' heads & scorpion tails? Wow, your imagination is without boundaries!

Wink
Post 30 Jun 2016, 03:03
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MHajduk



Joined: 30 Mar 2006
Posts: 6038
Location: Poland
MHajduk
bitRAKE wrote:
MHajduk, I have taken pictures of many similar species as yours in my FB album of flowers.
Many of North American plant species (for example Rudbeckias, calliopsis and evening primroses) were introduced here, in Europe, in the last three centuries. Hence the similarities between floras here and there. Smile
Post 30 Jun 2016, 17:43
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MHajduk



Joined: 30 Mar 2006
Posts: 6038
Location: Poland
MHajduk
Garden rose flowers in the color of magenta.

Image

Image
Post 30 Jun 2016, 17:44
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MHajduk



Joined: 30 Mar 2006
Posts: 6038
Location: Poland
MHajduk
Cirsium vulgare, commonly called "spear thistle".

A general view.

Image


A closeup view of the inflorescence (not fully developed yet).

Image
Post 30 Jun 2016, 21:04
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YONG



Joined: 16 Mar 2005
Posts: 8000
Location: 22° 15' N | 114° 10' E
YONG
Spear thistle reminds me of starfruit:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carambola

Nice photos.
Post 01 Jul 2016, 03:50
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shoorick



Joined: 25 Feb 2005
Posts: 1607
Location: Ukraine
shoorick
ooh! i hate those thistles when walk in grass with naked feet :S
Post 01 Jul 2016, 05:40
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YONG



Joined: 16 Mar 2005
Posts: 8000
Location: 22° 15' N | 114° 10' E
YONG
shoorick wrote:
ooh! i hate those thistles when walk in grass with naked feet :S
Why would you walk in grass with naked feet? Rolling Eyes

Are you a naturist?

Wink
Post 01 Jul 2016, 07:01
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shoorick



Joined: 25 Feb 2005
Posts: 1607
Location: Ukraine
shoorick
so, when you do not wear gloves, do you become naturist also?
++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Image

Naturists? I see....
Post 01 Jul 2016, 08:31
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YONG



Joined: 16 Mar 2005
Posts: 8000
Location: 22° 15' N | 114° 10' E
YONG
Refer to:

http://www.merckmanuals.com/home/infections/parasitic-infections/overview-of-parasitic-infections
Quote:
Some parasites enter through the soles of the feet when a person walks barefoot ...
Bro, I am just worrying about your well-being. No offence!

Wink
Post 01 Jul 2016, 09:23
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shoorick



Joined: 25 Feb 2005
Posts: 1607
Location: Ukraine
shoorick
your conclusion was just too funny to me Razz
Post 01 Jul 2016, 09:27
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MHajduk



Joined: 30 Mar 2006
Posts: 6038
Location: Poland
MHajduk
Tragopogon pratensis, known by the common name "meadow salsify".

Image
Post 01 Jul 2016, 16:47
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MHajduk



Joined: 30 Mar 2006
Posts: 6038
Location: Poland
MHajduk
Oenothera biennis, commonly known as "evening primrose".

Image
Post 01 Jul 2016, 16:48
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shoorick



Joined: 25 Feb 2005
Posts: 1607
Location: Ukraine
shoorick
it seems, somebody is sitting on that Tragopogon Wink
Post 01 Jul 2016, 19:15
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MHajduk



Joined: 30 Mar 2006
Posts: 6038
Location: Poland
MHajduk
shoorick wrote:
it seems, somebody is sitting on that Tragopogon Wink
I've noticed that it's a quite often situation when I can see an ant, a fly, a bee or any other insect hiding somewhere on a just photographed plant. That's good because it means the area where I take these photos is full of life. Smile
Post 01 Jul 2016, 20:41
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YONG



Joined: 16 Mar 2005
Posts: 8000
Location: 22° 15' N | 114° 10' E
YONG
Haha ... tragopogon pratensis reminds me of cotton candy:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cotton_candy

Nice photos.

Wink
Post 02 Jul 2016, 05:04
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MHajduk



Joined: 30 Mar 2006
Posts: 6038
Location: Poland
MHajduk
Tragopogon beside of the common name "meadow salsify", already mentioned by me a few posts above, has also other names such as a bit fancy-sounding "goat's beard" (the Polish name "Kozibród" for the genus means equally the same as "goat's beard"). I had wondered last evening what kind of etymology stands behind the Latin genus name Tragopogon and I understood it thanks to a kind of a sudden enlightenment: those who remember lectures of their mother languages at school most probably had a chance to get to know something about history of the classical Greek and Latin literature and should also recall the etymology of the word "tragedy" which derived from the words "tragos" ("a goat" in English) and "oide" ("a song"). Hence, by similarity, splitting the proper name "tragopogon" into the words "tragos" ("a goat") and "pogon" ("a beard") leads us to the right way of understanding the genus name of the aforementioned plant. The most important thing is we can memorize its fancy Greek / Latin name without an extra memory efforts, just by associations.

The name "goat's beard" comes, accordingly to some sources, from the characteristic form of the dried bracts hanging downward after the seeds dispersal.

The meadow salsify's root is edible and in the past had been eaten as an asparagus counterpart. Smile

Image


Image


Image
Post 02 Jul 2016, 16:04
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MHajduk



Joined: 30 Mar 2006
Posts: 6038
Location: Poland
MHajduk
Vicia cracca, commonly known by the name "bird vetch".

A general view of the plant.

Image


A closeup shot of the inflorescence.

Image


A closeup shot of the tendrils twining around the grass' culm.

Image
Post 02 Jul 2016, 17:15
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