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Index > Heap > electronicles - i want to make a computer with out 0 & 1

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sid123



Joined: 30 Jul 2013
Posts: 340
Location: Asia, Singapore
sid123
Quote:
to add twist into conspiracy, maybe revolution == sid123?

If Singapore is 8 hours by bus from where you live, why not come and see for yourself?
Smile

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Post 06 Apr 2014, 04:41
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badc0de02



Joined: 25 Nov 2013
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badc0de02
Post 07 Apr 2014, 21:56
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sleepsleep



Joined: 05 Oct 2006
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sleepsleep
here, maybe something different than conventional method,
http://news.stanford.edu/pr/2014/pr-neurogrid-boahen-engineering-042814.html

Stanford bioengineers create circuit board modeled on the human brain
Quote:

Stanford bioengineers have developed faster, more energy-efficient microchips based on the human brain – 9,000 times faster and using significantly less power than a typical PC. This offers greater possibilities for advances in robotics and a new way of understanding the brain. For instance, a chip as fast and efficient as the human brain could drive prosthetic limbs with the speed and complexity of our own actions.
Post 30 Apr 2014, 02:52
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badc0de02



Joined: 25 Nov 2013
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badc0de02
thanks sleepsleep, this is what i searched for!
this is realy interesting
Post 30 Apr 2014, 06:33
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badc0de02



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badc0de02
if it not works with binary how it saves the data??
Post 11 Aug 2014, 09:39
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sleepsleep



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sleepsleep
yeah, i asked something like this before, no much idea and answer,

is the logic of computing basic is 0 and 1 and nothing else?

since all other states could be joined by using 0 and 1, is there anything that breakthrough this concept?
Post 11 Aug 2014, 13:33
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neville



Joined: 13 Jul 2008
Posts: 507
Location: New Zealand
neville
sleepsleep wrote:
is the logic of computing basic is 0 and 1 and nothing else?
Two-state (binary) logic was adopted for computers because the two states are easily implemented by an electronic switch (transistor) being either OFF or ON. Usually OFF=0, ON=1 but anything is possible!

One of the advantages of ON/OFF logic circuits is that the transistors are always in a low-power dissipation state. When OFF, the current is 0 and hence power is 0. When ON, the voltage is almost 0 and hence power is low.

But in the old days of bipolar transistors (e.g. 74 series TTL logic) power consumption per logic gate was still an important consideration, mainly because of the power consumed while switching between the ON and OFF states.

Over the years lower-power logic circuits were developed, but initially at the expense of reduced switching speeds. I still remember the old 4000 series CMOS logic which could only be clocked at a few MHz (less than 10MHz) which also reduced if the supply voltage was increased. However it's power consumption was very low compared to all the 74 series logic families, except 74HC, 74HCT etc.

Today we have even lower power logic, but much much faster thanks mainly to miniaturisation. Transistors are now well under 1 micron apart on the silicon substrate. But even though the power dissipated per gate is extremely low, the high packing density means getting rid of the heat generated in a relatively small area is still a problem. Which is why CPU's still have to have large heat sinks and cooling fans.

With modern ultra low power NMOS I believe intermediate voltage switching states are quite practical. So for example a ternary CPU could operate on 3 voltage levels - OFF, 1/2 and ON. Instead of Binary digITs (BITS) 0 and 1 there would be Ternary DigITs or TITS 0, 1 and 2, or whatever. The equivalent of 64 bits would require only about 40 tits. And a 64-tit CPU would be equivalent to a 100-bit CPU. Even better would be a 4-state quaternary CPU operating on the voltage levels - OFF, 1/3, 2/3 and ON, represented by QUITS 0, 1, 2, 3 perhaps. Then a 32-quit CPU would be exactly equivalent to a 64-bit CPU. And an 8-quit memory byte (quyte) would have 65536 possible values instead of 256, equivalent to a 16-bit word...

As the number of voltage levels increases, we start to get closer to "analogue" but processing remains digital. The old op-amp based analogue computers would be very pathetic in comparison.

Although CPU's could be multilevel, the main problem would be developing reliable multilevel non-volatile external storage. Multilevel RAM and cache memory would be much less of a problem, which means memory operating systems would be much more preferable Smile Mass storage drivers in a memory OS could even utilise existing conventional storage devices by performing multilevel-to-binary conversions. The performance penalty would of course be far greater with a disk operating system.

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FAMOS - the first memory operating system
Post 12 Aug 2014, 03:44
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sleepsleep



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sleepsleep
hi, neville
thanks for the information,

is the basic of digital processing equal 0 and 1? i mean, is that no matter how evolve and expand the concept of what bit hold in future, they are still able to simulate it using only 0 and 1, 2 states?

intel is reaching 14nm technology, and on its way to 10nm, continuing the pace of Moore’s Law has only gotten more difficult.
http://www.anandtech.com/show/8367/intels-14nm-technology-in-detail

couldn't imagine how tiny is 14nm, crazy stuff.

neville wrote:

which means memory operating systems would be much more preferable

yeah, agree with you,
i think such concept exists already in some linux distro,

1. boot up,
2. load os into ram disk,
3. load and process boot up modification file,
4. let users do their stuffs,
5. check modification to os,
6. write into boot up modification applying file,
7. shutdown,

you got link for your memory os? FAMOS?
Post 12 Aug 2014, 17:58
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