flat assembler
Message board for the users of flat assembler.

Index > Heap > Do you people use version control?

Goto page 1, 2  Next

Which version control software do you use?
Git
21%
 21%  [ 3 ]
Mercurial
7%
 7%  [ 1 ]
CVS
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
Subversion
28%
 28%  [ 4 ]
Darcs
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
Perforce
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
Bazaar
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
Other
7%
 7%  [ 1 ]
None, I don't use any
35%
 35%  [ 5 ]
Total Votes : 14

Author
Thread Post new topic Reply to topic
nyrtzi



Joined: 08 Jul 2006
Posts: 192
Location: Off the scale in the third direction
nyrtzi
Well do you? I've been using it for years and find it a mystery why some don't. If any of you feel up to it I'd be happy if you were to talk a bit about the reasons behind your decisions about this thing.

Do you use version control? Why or why not?

Git? Mercurial? Subversion? CVS? Darcs? Perforce? Bazaar? Some other?

Why did you pick that specific one?

Anything to say about the benefits or disadvantages?
Post 29 Oct 2013, 15:08
View user's profile Send private message Reply with quote
HaHaAnonymous



Joined: 02 Dec 2012
Posts: 1180
Location: Unknown
HaHaAnonymous
[ Post removed by author. ]


Last edited by HaHaAnonymous on 28 Feb 2015, 19:15; edited 3 times in total
Post 29 Oct 2013, 15:12
View user's profile Send private message Reply with quote
JohnFound



Joined: 16 Jun 2003
Posts: 3502
Location: Bulgaria
JohnFound
The only really good version control system for the assembly programmer is Fossil SCM.

It is small, simple and fast. And in the same time feature rich, self contained and simply beautiful. Smile

So, please, include it in the poll.
Post 29 Oct 2013, 15:12
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website ICQ Number Reply with quote
HaHaAnonymous



Joined: 02 Dec 2012
Posts: 1180
Location: Unknown
HaHaAnonymous
[ Post removed by author. ]


Last edited by HaHaAnonymous on 28 Feb 2015, 19:15; edited 1 time in total
Post 29 Oct 2013, 15:16
View user's profile Send private message Reply with quote
malpolud



Joined: 18 Jul 2011
Posts: 344
Location: Broken hippocampus
malpolud
Subversion at work. I am going to switch to GIT for my personal projects cause it is more feature rich (local versions and so on) and reasonable.
Post 29 Oct 2013, 15:48
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website Reply with quote
Tomasz Grysztar



Joined: 16 Jun 2003
Posts: 7751
Location: Kraków, Poland
Tomasz Grysztar
I have been using Subversion a lot, because that was the one usually used by the multi-developer projects that was involved in. Then I discovered Git and liked it enough to start using it for the new projects I start, even private ones. I like its distributed architecture (including the fact that I can use it completely locally) and ability to re-write history.

Too bad that there was no software like Git of Fossil back in 1999, when I started fasm. I considered an idea to create a Git repository based on archived fasm releases, but it would not be as useful as the real history with separate commits for all the features and fixes.
Post 29 Oct 2013, 15:50
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website Reply with quote
nyrtzi



Joined: 08 Jul 2006
Posts: 192
Location: Off the scale in the third direction
nyrtzi
@JohnFound
Unfortunately I was unable to find a way to edit the poll.

Yep, small is beautiful. Oh well. Usually it is.

Fossil seems interesting. Not perhaps my cup of tea but I
like the idea of including the whole toolset into one package.
Post 29 Oct 2013, 16:29
View user's profile Send private message Reply with quote
nyrtzi



Joined: 08 Jul 2006
Posts: 192
Location: Off the scale in the third direction
nyrtzi
@HaHaAnonymous

No benefits? So when working on a piece of code you have no need
to keep track of the history of your code? Or do you simply keep full copies
of the source tree around either in zipped or unzipped form?
Post 29 Oct 2013, 16:37
View user's profile Send private message Reply with quote
nyrtzi



Joined: 08 Jul 2006
Posts: 192
Location: Off the scale in the third direction
nyrtzi
Personally I use Mercurial. Oh well I do have to use Subversion, Git and others as well but when I can pick for myself I usually use Mercurial for a couple a reasons:

1) I'm used to it and no longer need to spend time thinking how to use it

2) Pushing and pulling changesets between boxes is easy and secure for as many people working on the codebase as needed

3) With the Queue extension I can have as many separately version controlled workspaces as I want for code I'm not yet ready to commit to the actual repo of the working directory

As far as the benefits of using version control in general go I'd say for example the following:

1) Allows throwing away of committed code (I'd rather not have commented out chunks of code or dead code in my codebase)

2) Save you effort compared to doing it all manually

3) Helps with all the hassles of having more than one person working on a codebase

4) Centralized management of for example configuration files deployed all around your infrastructure

Looking at how people do the same stuff manually without the proper tools I just feel happy that I've taken the time to learn to use those tools. Honestly the tools just save you so much work and trouble.
Post 29 Oct 2013, 17:21
View user's profile Send private message Reply with quote
HaHaAnonymous



Joined: 02 Dec 2012
Posts: 1180
Location: Unknown
HaHaAnonymous
[ Post removed by author. ]


Last edited by HaHaAnonymous on 28 Feb 2015, 19:15; edited 1 time in total
Post 29 Oct 2013, 19:06
View user's profile Send private message Reply with quote
TmX



Joined: 02 Mar 2006
Posts: 822
Location: Jakarta, Indonesia
TmX
We usually use subversion (and git, ocasionally) at work.
Now, using version control becomes my habit, even for personal project.

Being able to work on multiple versions, revert the code in case the app is broken, easily see the code differences etc are nice things I don't want to lose. Smile
Post 30 Oct 2013, 03:03
View user's profile Send private message Reply with quote
nyrtzi



Joined: 08 Jul 2006
Posts: 192
Location: Off the scale in the third direction
nyrtzi
@HaHaAnonymous

Aha, ok. So you use the manual backup approach that I've seen many others use also.
The reason for why your approach wouldn't work for me is twofold:

1) You remember all the changes you've made to your codebase? Good for you. However I have too many codebases to work on in order for me to be able to keep all of the changes in my head.

Of course it is possible to put a lot of information about all the changes into comments and documentation but those always have the problem of having to keep them up to date.

And there is the matter of how many different "released" versions of software I have deployed on other machines or in other words the amount of variations of the codebase that I need to maintain and develop.

2) How many backups do you make and how often? The last time I tried using that approach I ended up with the problem that first I wasn't making them often enough to be able to revert and track any big or small change I had done earlier.

Later on I had difficulty finding the code I wanted from all those backups which all had different names which did or didn't reflect what changes it had as I didn't want to make the names that long even though I wanted to make them descriptive.

Or is this simply a codebase size and complexity issue?
Post 30 Oct 2013, 07:13
View user's profile Send private message Reply with quote
HaHaAnonymous



Joined: 02 Dec 2012
Posts: 1180
Location: Unknown
HaHaAnonymous
[ Post removed by author. ]


Last edited by HaHaAnonymous on 28 Feb 2015, 19:14; edited 1 time in total
Post 30 Oct 2013, 12:13
View user's profile Send private message Reply with quote
cod3b453



Joined: 25 Aug 2004
Posts: 619
cod3b453
For personal stuff SVN as it works nicely on windows (VisualSVNServer/TortoiseSVN) or unix platforms out of the box. I tried git and Mercurial once but I never got them to work properly/nicely.

Work have-moved/are-moving from CVS to Perforce; I don't recommend either.
Post 30 Oct 2013, 21:42
View user's profile Send private message Reply with quote
revolution
When all else fails, read the source


Joined: 24 Aug 2004
Posts: 17467
Location: In your JS exploiting you and your system
revolution
Ever since JohnFound mentioned Fossil here some time ago I have been interested in it because of the single file architecture of it. A single executable and a single file repository. This makes it easy to install, migrate, backup and remove. The only thing I am a bit hesitant about is the sqlite DB format for the repository not being human readable. Perhaps I am just being too picky? But I do like the idea of being able to manually rebuild a corrupted system without having to go into binary file formats and special viewers and/or editors.
Post 31 Oct 2013, 14:18
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website Reply with quote
JohnFound



Joined: 16 Jun 2003
Posts: 3502
Location: Bulgaria
JohnFound
revolution wrote:
The only thing I am a bit hesitant about is the sqlite DB format for the repository not being human readable.


But how the repository can be "human readable" if everything inside is compressed? (BTW with very good ratio).
Notice that on DVCS, you simply can get one of the cloned repositories and restore the corrupted one. But as a rule, SQLite databases are really very robust. I never saw corrupted one.

_________________
Tox ID: 48C0321ADDB2FE5F644BB5E3D58B0D58C35E5BCBC81D7CD333633FEDF1047914A534256478D9
Post 31 Oct 2013, 14:38
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website ICQ Number Reply with quote
revolution
When all else fails, read the source


Joined: 24 Aug 2004
Posts: 17467
Location: In your JS exploiting you and your system
revolution
The very latest version 1.27 fixes this bug:
Quote:
Updates to SQLite to prevent opening a repository file using file descriptors 1 or 2 on unix. This fixes a bug under which an assertion failure could overwrite part of a repository database file, corrupting it.
And actually I am not very concerned about compression since my HDD is already measured in TB and I can't type source code so quickly to fill it up any time soon.
Post 31 Oct 2013, 16:17
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website Reply with quote
JohnFound



Joined: 16 Jun 2003
Posts: 3502
Location: Bulgaria
JohnFound
Well, bugs are everywhere. Smile But I think that several tens of thousands text files as database is really bad idea - it is impossible to keep it in consistent state, so yes, it will be easy to be fixed, but you will be forced to fix it again and again. And the repository can only grow.

The compression is not because the HDD it is about the network - traffic, hosting, etc.
Post 31 Oct 2013, 17:15
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website ICQ Number Reply with quote
dogman



Joined: 18 Jul 2013
Posts: 114
dogman
JohnFound wrote:
The only really good version control system for the assembly programmer is Fossil SCM.

It is small, simple and fast. And in the same time feature rich, self contained and simply beautiful. Smile

So, please, include it in the poll.


+1. fossil is great and solves many problems. It was designed by the guy who wrote sqlite and that's what it uses for a database. It builds easily on any posix platform, no prerequisites, no layers and layers of garbage required.

_________________
Sources? Ahahaha! We don't need no stinkin' sources!
Post 18 Nov 2013, 11:51
View user's profile Send private message Reply with quote
dogman



Joined: 18 Jul 2013
Posts: 114
dogman
nyrtzi wrote:
Well do you? I've been using it for years and find it a mystery why some don't. If any of you feel up to it I'd be happy if you were to talk a bit about the reasons behind your decisions about this thing.

Do you use version control? Why or why not?

Git? Mercurial? Subversion? CVS? Darcs? Perforce? Bazaar? Some other?

Why did you pick that specific one?

Anything to say about the benefits or disadvantages?


At work for some projects we use it and others we don't use it. None of the versions you mentioned btw. For my own stuff I tend to use fossil but I work alone. I don't like git, it's the typical brainless Linux-centric POS technology that's ruining the world of programming. Mercurial and subversion are ok. I like subversion's view that people check out a file and nobody can update it at the same time. CVS is old but still works mostly ok. I don't think I have used other ones than that on POSIX OS.

I have used a few others since the early 1980s and in all that time I have only found one I really like and as far as I know they went out of business. I think whether version control helps depends a lot of many things like how big is your team, how many separate pieces of code go into what you are working on, whether you want to allow multiple people to work on the saem piece of code at the same time (stupid bordering on the suicidal) etc.

As usual one-size does not fit all.

_________________
Sources? Ahahaha! We don't need no stinkin' sources!
Post 18 Nov 2013, 11:56
View user's profile Send private message Reply with quote
Display posts from previous:
Post new topic Reply to topic

Jump to:  
Goto page 1, 2  Next

< Last Thread | Next Thread >
Forum Rules:
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Copyright © 1999-2020, Tomasz Grysztar. Also on YouTube, Twitter.

Website powered by rwasa.