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OzzY



Joined: 19 Sep 2003
Posts: 1029
Location: Everywhere
OzzY
Hi!
I need to buy a notebook for working with coding.
Gaming would be a bonus.

Whats a good notebook? I was told HP, but then i researched and they say it fails/breaks a lot.

Sony vaio and apple arr both expensive. I dont know why. Maybe you pay for the apple logo.

Please notice i live in 3rd world country and its expensive here.

Can you give me a sugestion? Whats a good brand? Hp, sony, Lg, asus?

Sorry for the typos. Im on tj e phone. My computer broke.

Thanks
Post 22 Nov 2012, 15:33
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sleepsleep



Joined: 05 Oct 2006
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sleepsleep
acer or etc brand (lenovo), choose those hat came with 3 years warranty?
i3 or i5 with 8GB, with or without windows would be sufficient.
Post 22 Nov 2012, 19:31
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JohnFound



Joined: 16 Jun 2003
Posts: 3500
Location: Bulgaria
JohnFound
I am working on ASUS eeepc 900 for 3..4 years and it is really very tough machine. I don't protect it at all. It was dropped from a 1 meter height on a curb stone edge and ended only with some dead pixels on the screen (later replaced with a new screen by myself). I also made several other repairs as well - batteries replaced, keyboard cleanup, etc. The hard disk is still alive without any problems (despite of the shocks).
I drag this computer with me everywhere - it is really mobile computer.
If all ASUS laptops are the same quality I can recommend them for everyone. But IMHO, the bigger laptops are probably more delicate. Smile
Post 22 Nov 2012, 19:42
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Picnic



Joined: 05 May 2007
Posts: 1287
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Picnic
JohnFound wrote:
If all ASUS laptops are the same quality I can recommend them for everyone.

Same experience, i own too an Asus Eee pc, working it to its limits from the first day i bought it, survived several falls.
Post 22 Nov 2012, 20:03
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OzzY



Joined: 19 Sep 2003
Posts: 1029
Location: Everywhere
OzzY
Lots of people recommended me Sony Vaio.

But it's expensive as hell!

Is Samsung a good brand for notebooks?
Post 22 Nov 2012, 23:36
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malpolud



Joined: 18 Jul 2011
Posts: 344
Location: Broken hippocampus
malpolud
I own a Sony Vaio for 4 years. It is quite good, when I bought it in 2008 it cost 400GBP and it was rather one of the cheapest ones. The battery is a pain in the ass: fully charged in the evening, laptop switched off (not hibernated or asleep) and not plugged in - in the morning the battery was charged only to 70%. It was a well known flaw of Sony Laptops - the only solution was to remove the battery. The battery after 9 months lasted only for 30 mins, and after 2 years it stopped to recognize the battery at all.

The other bad thing is that my DVD drive gone dead. Firstly it read CDs but now neither DVDs nor CDs work. But it could happen to any brand. The broken optical drive pisses me off when I need to reinstall the system.

Otherwise the laptop is a quite tough machine, no bad pixels on the screen, still very quiet, does not produce lots of heat - does not need any cooling stands in normal operation, there is absolutely no dust inside (I don't know how they achieved it).

Do I recommend? I don't know, it was a good choice for the money. My model is VGN-NR38e/s.

My next laptop will be the Lenovo Think Pad t-series imo it is perfect, but costs a lot.

_________________
There's nothing special about it,
It's either there when you're born or not.
Post 22 Nov 2012, 23:58
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revolution
When all else fails, read the source


Joined: 24 Aug 2004
Posts: 17247
Location: In your JS exploiting you and your system
revolution
I think all these anecdotes are good but ultimately not of much use since individual machines can be either good or bad regardless of the brand. My opinion is that most makes are generally the same as far as reliability and quality goes.

When I chose a new laptop recently I looked for screen dot resolution, screen size, matt finish screen (I don't like the reflective screens), keyboard layout (many keyboards do not have pgup and pgdn keys!), HDD size (or SSD if you want to risk it), and weight. I did consider the Vaio but without the pgup and pgdn keys it was a deal breaker. I eventually settled for a Lenovo with a small screen and high-res dot pitch.
Post 23 Nov 2012, 00:14
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OzzY



Joined: 19 Sep 2003
Posts: 1029
Location: Everywhere
OzzY
I decided for an ASUS with core i5, 8GB RAM, HD 750GB.

Perfect for coding and virtualization (lots of RAM).

ASUS seems very tough too as I researched in the internet.

I'm ordering it now online.
Post 23 Nov 2012, 00:43
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Coty



Joined: 17 May 2010
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Coty
Depends on the Asus... I bought a DELL inspiron n5050 (very sturdy laptop) for $400 dollars, it has and an i3 daul core @2.3Ghz and came with 4GB of DDR 3 ram, for $24 dollars I added another 4GB (daul slots).

I have seen allot of cheap dells, but this one is really well made for what little I paid. Allot of Asus are good, but I have also seen some pretty shitty ones. Really it's just like cars, it's not the manufacturer, its the model.
Post 23 Nov 2012, 01:03
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OzzY



Joined: 19 Sep 2003
Posts: 1029
Location: Everywhere
OzzY
Which one is better?

Notebook Asus N53TASX099R with AMD® A6-3420M processor, 6GB RAM, 750GB HD, LED Screen 15,6", Graphics card AMD® Radeon Mobility HD 6720G2 2GB DDR3 and Windows® 7 Home Basic 64

Notebook Asus K45A-VX113Q with Intel Core i5, 8GB RAM, 750GB HD, Intel video card Intel® HD Graphics 4000 shared, LED Screen 14'', Windows 7 Home Basic
Post 23 Nov 2012, 01:23
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revolution
When all else fails, read the source


Joined: 24 Aug 2004
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revolution
Better for what?
Post 23 Nov 2012, 01:51
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sleepsleep



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sleepsleep
/me scare of AMD processor,
Post 23 Nov 2012, 03:32
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JohnFound



Joined: 16 Jun 2003
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Location: Bulgaria
JohnFound
Well, in my opinion, these both are too fast for programming. The programs created on these computers will tend to be big and slow. Wink
IMHO, the real programmer should use Intel Atom or AMD Fusion based machines.
Post 23 Nov 2012, 05:10
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OzzY



Joined: 19 Sep 2003
Posts: 1029
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OzzY
I want it for coding and some light games.

I'm not a hardcore gamer. But the ability to run 3D stuff is cool.
Post 23 Nov 2012, 11:16
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Coty



Joined: 17 May 2010
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Coty
An intel i3 is plenty fast for light gaming. I play skyrim, minecraft, fable and bioshock on mine.

Intel HD 3000 is my graphics. I have no trouble with it, of course I can't exaxtly max all the graphics out (except minecraft and fable), but it runs fine.

People have made fun of me about using an i3 until they see how fast it really is. But you have to remember, a core2duo was the biggest thing on the market a few years ago, and the i3 tramps it.

AMD sucks imho.
Post 23 Nov 2012, 13:42
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revolution
When all else fails, read the source


Joined: 24 Aug 2004
Posts: 17247
Location: In your JS exploiting you and your system
revolution
Remember that getting extra speed means also getting shorter battery life. If the laptop is really for coding then I suggest you buy the slowest and least power hungry CPU.

And since you will likely be spending a lot of time looking at the screen make sure you get a high dot pitch setup. And see whether you like matt or glossy finish before you pay money for something you might not like.

And for coding you will want a keyboard that gives good controls. Look for things like pgup, pgdn, break etc.

If you are going to be lugging it around a lot then buy a small and light model. Your shoulder will thank you for it.
Post 23 Nov 2012, 13:56
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Coty



Joined: 17 May 2010
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Coty
^ Yes, and also, the stronger the CPU the hotter it will get. this mixed with notebooks rather restrictive cooling (I don't care how good it is, all of them are restrictive compared to their desktop variants) is a big pain.

Also, battery is bad enough on an i3, on my 6 cell will operate my laptop for about 1.5~4 hours, depending on how I use it. My netbook with an atom and a similar sized miliamp 6cell would last between 6-9 hours depending on how I used it. granted the display on my laptop is 5" bigger... but still, that's a huge power gap.

Note, that my netbook would play fable, halo and minecraft just fine, just on lower settings Very Happy
Post 23 Nov 2012, 14:05
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rugxulo



Joined: 09 Aug 2005
Posts: 2341
Location: Usono (aka, USA)
rugxulo
I know the thread explains some of this, but ...

Decent OS support is crucial, so you may have to decide which OS ahead of time (and make sure all programs you want to run are supported). Ideally you can dual boot or use a VM, but VMs are often buggy and slow (esp. without VT-X, which most Intel cpus still lack).

Wi-fi network cards are sometimes wonky and hard to get working under Linux. Beware of that. Even if their is an open source driver, you may still have to have a wired connection to download and install the firmware (for copyright reasons). Also some routers / ISPs only let you initially setup from Windows.

Video cards (and drivers) are also a problem for similar reasons, though it's been said that Steam is on its way to Linux too. Most average laptops aren't good for heavy gaming.

Built-in MP3 encoders and similar patented stuff may or may not be available to you depending on which distro you use and which country. (Heck, even Win8 doesn't play DVDs anymore by default unless you buy an add-on, right?)

If you require iTunes or similar support, you'll need a proper OS. If you don't care (like me), then it doesn't matter.

Battery life, ugh. Definitely get a laptop with good battery life. I would say less than 3 or 4 hours is bad. But keep in mind that some companies (e.g. Dell) require you to purchase replacements "only" from them ($160 US after two years of fairly average but daily use). Also AMD laptops used to be very power hungry, not sure anymore on newer versions (esp. Fusion ones). Flash also eats up battery life like crazy for me, even on Intel, but my ARM-based Android tablet is much more efficient for that (hardware support??).

I'm sure you're aware of whether USB mouse vs. trackpad or 4 GB vs. 32-bit OS, etc. A netbook with Atom and 32-bit XP may be more reasonable if you don't need heavy powerful stuff.
Post 25 Nov 2012, 02:13
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OzzY



Joined: 19 Sep 2003
Posts: 1029
Location: Everywhere
OzzY
Ok. I bought my new laptop.

I have a question:

Does installing Linux on a laptop that comes with Windows make me lose the warranty?
Post 27 Nov 2012, 15:07
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revolution
When all else fails, read the source


Joined: 24 Aug 2004
Posts: 17247
Location: In your JS exploiting you and your system
revolution
OzzY wrote:
Does installing Linux on a laptop that comes with Windows make me lose the warranty?
You will have to ask the place you bought it from. We don't know your warranty conditions.
Post 27 Nov 2012, 15:16
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