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YONG



Joined: 16 Mar 2005
Posts: 8000
Location: 22° 15' N | 114° 10' E
YONG
May I ask all those forum members who are native English speakers to help me with this challenge? Wink

A tuck shop sold 144 cans of soft drink and 84 cans of fruit juice.


1. Which question, (a) or (b), sounds better?

(a) By what fraction is the sale of soft drink greater than that of fruit juice?

(b) What fraction of the cans of soft drink are sold more than that of fruit juice?


The tuck shop sold 60 more cans of soft drink than fruit juice.

60/84 = 5/7


2. Which answer, (c) or (d), sounds better?

(c) The sale of soft drink is 5/7 more than that of fruit juice.

(d) 5/7 of soft drink is sold more than that of fruit juice.


This is urgent. Thanks in advance! Wink
Post 20 Oct 2011, 10:23
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asmhack



Joined: 01 Feb 2008
Posts: 431
asmhack
a, c
Post 20 Oct 2011, 12:16
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Tyler



Joined: 19 Nov 2009
Posts: 1216
Location: NC, USA
Tyler
I agree with asmhack. A and C sound more natural.

As a side note: You have good grammar. Your sentence structures are pretty complex, even for some native speakers.
Post 20 Oct 2011, 20:50
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vid
Verbosity in development


Joined: 05 Sep 2003
Posts: 7105
Location: Slovakia
vid
a,c obviously

General advice for english learning: Watch english TV shows (Simpsons, The Big Bang Theory, Dallas, whatever rings your bell) with english subtitles. In my experience that gives one great reading and speaking skills, and most important of all, ties them together.
Post 20 Oct 2011, 22:05
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YONG



Joined: 16 Mar 2005
Posts: 8000
Location: 22° 15' N | 114° 10' E
YONG
Thank you so much!

The above was a tiny part of a "trial" Chinese-English translation work that I was working on.

(a) & (c) were my translated text whereas (b) & (d) were the edited text recommended by the editor.

To me, (b) & (d) sounded cumbersome & confusing.

That's why I wanted to seek a "3rd" opinion from you guys.

Tyler wrote:
As a side note: You have good grammar.
Well, I suggest you visit my blog to find out my line of trade.

vid wrote:
General advice for english learning: Watch english TV shows (Simpsons, The Big Bang Theory, Dallas, whatever rings your bell) with english subtitles.
You are right. That is a good way to learn English. But we should stay alert when watching these TV shows - grammatical errors pop up from time to time!

Wink
Post 21 Oct 2011, 12:11
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AsmGuru62



Joined: 28 Jan 2004
Posts: 1409
Location: Toronto, Canada
AsmGuru62
Good point on TV shows.
I am from Russia, and when I came to Canada in 1995 - I knew just basics in English. Since I love TV - I watched a lot and in about a couple of years was able to watch movies and shows with no subtitles. Then, of course, I talk a lot at work - I am a Software Engineer, so I have to talk and write a lot with clients, do presentations, etc.

I remember watching "Basic Instinct" with Russian subtitles (before coming to Canada) and then way later I did see it in its raw form - much more fun!!
Post 21 Oct 2011, 14:04
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tom tobias



Joined: 09 Sep 2003
Posts: 1320
Location: usa
tom tobias
AsmGuru62 wrote:
and in about a couple of years was able to watch movies and shows with no subtitles.

Nice.

I am regressing.

I cannot fathom any British television program, downloaded from the internet, without subtitles.

American television actors mumble, so I can't understand them, either, but the content is generally so banal, that subtitles are not necessary.

Here's the exception to that rule:

Boardwalk Empires. A good show, in my opinion.

Steve Buscemi is excellent as the corrupt mayor of Atlantic city in 1920's/1930's. The Scottish lass who plays his Irish mistress, Kelly MacDonald, is really talented, and she sufficiently softens her brogue, so that I can understand most of her conversation, even without subtitles. That's not the case for the dialogue of Charlie Cox, the Englishman who plays an Irish gangster, with a very convincing accent.

Still, a lot of the dialogue flies right over my head, if I don't enable those subtitles....It is a bit like listening to Feryno, explaining virtualization based antidebugging ....(with or without subtitles!!)

Smile
Post 24 Oct 2011, 20:06
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YONG



Joined: 16 Mar 2005
Posts: 8000
Location: 22° 15' N | 114° 10' E
YONG
tom tobias wrote:
Boardwalk Empires. A good show, in my opinion.
Wikipedia wrote:
The first episode, with a final cost of $18 million, was directed by Martin Scorsese and was the most expensive pilot episode produced in television history.
I guess MONEY plus TALENT always gives rise to good shows. Wink

Here is the reference, professor.

Wink
Post 25 Oct 2011, 06:03
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YONG



Joined: 16 Mar 2005
Posts: 8000
Location: 22° 15' N | 114° 10' E
YONG
L = Litre or Liter

(1) There are 3 L of fruit juice in each bottle.

(2) There is 1 L of fruit juice in each bottle.

(3) There is/are 0.6 L of fruit juice in each bottle.

(4) There is/are 3/5 L of fruit juice in each bottle.

In (3) & (4), which one, is or are, sounds more natural to native English speakers? Rolling Eyes

Wink
Post 05 Nov 2011, 04:25
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revolution
When all else fails, read the source


Joined: 24 Aug 2004
Posts: 17270
Location: In your JS exploiting you and your system
revolution
YONG wrote:
L = Litre or Liter
Yes. Either is acceptable. But for customary usage each country has its own preference. Mostly USA uses liter (because of Webster's simplified spelling campaign) and other countries use litre, but there are exceptions.
YONG wrote:
(1) There are 3 L of fruit juice in each bottle.

(2) There is 1 L of fruit juice in each bottle.

(3) There is/are 0.6 L of fruit juice in each bottle.

(4) There is/are 3/5 L of fruit juice in each bottle.

In (3) & (4), which one, is or are, sounds more natural to native English speakers? Rolling Eyes
Generally, use is for quantities of one, and use are for any other quantity (including zero).
Post 05 Nov 2011, 04:49
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YONG



Joined: 16 Mar 2005
Posts: 8000
Location: 22° 15' N | 114° 10' E
YONG
revolution, thanks a lot! Wink
Post 05 Nov 2011, 05:31
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Enko



Joined: 03 Apr 2007
Posts: 678
Location: Mar del Plata
Enko
Quote:
L = Litre or Liter

its like:
centre or center
metre or meter
Post 05 Nov 2011, 16:57
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