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Index > Windows > where the file name (and extension) is stored?

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Teehee



Joined: 05 Aug 2009
Posts: 568
Location: Brazil
Teehee
hi.

if you save a file in a disket or CD and open that file in another PC, the files inside will have still the same name. But if you open the file in a HexEditor you cant find its name, or extension there... so where is that stored?

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Post 17 Feb 2011, 22:46
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ManOfSteel



Joined: 02 Feb 2005
Posts: 1154
ManOfSteel
Somewhere in the filesystem (ISO9660/CDFS, NTFS, FAT, UFS etc.) structures (root directory entry, inode, etc.)?

When you "open" a file (using any kind of editor), you're reading the "data area" of that file. The filesystem structures are only available to the operating system or to you if you have enough privileges and you open the disk as a raw device using an appropriate application.
Post 18 Feb 2011, 00:05
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Overflowz



Joined: 03 Sep 2010
Posts: 1046
Overflowz
Teehee
Dude!!! I saw like that in my dream yesterday lol Very Happy
Sorry for off-topic.
Post 18 Feb 2011, 00:34
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edfed



Joined: 20 Feb 2006
Posts: 4240
Location: 2018
edfed
it is a secret, not because it is hard to understand, but because it is hard for them to broadcast the docs for free.
Post 18 Feb 2011, 08:35
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f0dder



Joined: 19 Feb 2004
Posts: 3170
Location: Denmark
f0dder
Stop smoking crack, edfed.

Information on the common filesystems is readily available, with the biggest problem being NTFS... but the opensource linux drivers for it are pretty stable by now. Read the source, Luke!

PS: if you can't directly find filenames in a disk image, it's probably because of unicode (NTFS) or the wacky way FAT stores long filenames.
Post 18 Feb 2011, 11:22
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ManOfSteel



Joined: 02 Feb 2005
Posts: 1154
ManOfSteel
f0dder wrote:
Stop smoking crack, edfed.

I think he was being sarcastic, but that's just me...

f0dder wrote:
Information on the common filesystems is readily available, with the biggest problem being NTFS

Well, not really. I've always found www.ntfs.com to be quite informative.
And these might help too:
http://www.reddragonfly.org/ntfs/concepts/file.html
http://www.cse.scu.edu/~tschwarz/COEN152_06/Lectures/NTFS.html
Post 18 Feb 2011, 13:57
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revolution
When all else fails, read the source


Joined: 24 Aug 2004
Posts: 17474
Location: In your JS exploiting you and your system
revolution
I just wish there was better OS support for viewing and manipulating the NTFS alternate data streams. Some apps like to use them to hide stuff. Really annoying.


Last edited by revolution on 18 Feb 2011, 15:12; edited 1 time in total
Post 18 Feb 2011, 14:01
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f0dder



Joined: 19 Feb 2004
Posts: 3170
Location: Denmark
f0dder
[quote="ManOfSteel"]
f0dder wrote:
f0dder wrote:
Information on the common filesystems is readily available, with the biggest problem being NTFS

Well, not really. I've always found www.ntfs.com to be quite informative.
And these might help too:
http://www.reddragonfly.org/ntfs/concepts/file.html
http://www.cse.scu.edu/~tschwarz/COEN152_06/Lectures/NTFS.html
It's unofficial documents, and how up-to-date are they? One thing is the on-disk format, another is all the code you need to implement to deal properly with the logical structure of the fs.

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Post 18 Feb 2011, 14:05
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ManOfSteel



Joined: 02 Feb 2005
Posts: 1154
ManOfSteel
f0dder wrote:
It's unofficial documents, and how up-to-date are they?

In the first case, unofficial documents made by a 13-year-old company that sells data recovery software. It's surely better than nothing IMO.

f0dder wrote:
One thing is the on-disk format, another is all the code you need to implement to deal properly with the logical structure of the fs.

Teehee is just asking for "educative information" and is not implementing a filesystem driver (or at least didn't say so).

I've used this information more than once for "educative" purposes but I don't trust it blindly and I actually don't trust *any* of the existing drivers. When I need to read/write from/to an NTFS partition, I only trust the official Microsoft driver included in Windows. Otherwise, I always mount it as read-only using FreeBSD's native driver.
Post 18 Feb 2011, 15:48
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