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revolution
When all else fails, read the source


Joined: 24 Aug 2004
Posts: 17247
Location: In your JS exploiting you and your system
revolution
Madis731 wrote:
*with wear-leveling SSDs can write a PB (petabyte) or more before failing. This means that even a 100GB-per-day-torrent-leaching-machine will last YEARS.
You would be better off using a normal HDD if all you do is download 100GB per day. You don't need the extra performance that SSD provides, you'll just waste your money for no good reason.

No sense buying an expensive SSD drive unless you actually need the advantages it provides.
Post 03 Feb 2011, 19:33
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f0dder



Joined: 19 Feb 2004
Posts: 3170
Location: Denmark
f0dder
revolution wrote:
I don't know of any current SSDs using MLC, all SSDs I have ever seen use SLC with expected endurance of 100k+ cycles.
Most SSDs on the market today use MLC, only the high-end (and insanely expensive) products use SLC. My workstation Intel X25-E is SLC, my laptop OCZ Vertex-2 is MLC.

JohnFound wrote:
SSD have only one big advantage for the user - low power consumption.
And one really big advantage for the industry - short live expectation.
You know, the industry don't have any use for everlasting hardware. Very Happy
A lot of the SSDs on the market end up being more power hungry than a laptop 2.5" harddrive under normal operation - HDDs get shut down on idle, SSDs tend to draw the same amount of power all the time. Things are changing, but you risk ending up with lower battery time depending on the model chosen.

The advantages of SSDs?

Speed. Speed, speed, speed. I don't care that much about the sequential read/write speeds. Sure, 220MB/s is impressive, but the ~100MB/s modern HDDs will give you is sufficient for most uses. What's important is the random I/O speeds, where most HDDs will drop to under 1MB/s, but SSDs zoom by (even if some drop from 200MB/s to 20MB/s, it's still craploads faster than 0.2MB/s from a HDD).

No moving parts - less noise, both from the spinning itself as well as resonance. Less heat, depending on which SSD you get.

You don't get a head crash wiping all your data, supposedly SSDs degrade gracefully (but it's still too early to tell).

Biggest problem? You get used to the speed, so instead of your system with a SSD feeling fast, it feels normal and everything else feels hellishly sluggish.
Post 13 Feb 2011, 20:21
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Madis731



Joined: 25 Sep 2003
Posts: 2141
Location: Estonia
Madis731
Problem with SSDs (I'm not kidding) is they are so fast that you are CPU-limited most of the time so your CPU nears 100% a lot more than it used to. SSDs make laptops HOT! Smile
Post 15 Feb 2011, 10:52
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f0dder



Joined: 19 Feb 2004
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f0dder
Coty wrote:
As far as I have seen some SSDs have an extra 4-8MB flash for when sectors begin to ware it will re-alocate the sector to the backup flash and warn that disk is failing.
It's a lot more than 4-8MB - some drives have more than 20% overprovisioning. For intel SSDs, it seems like you might be able to change the amount of over-provisioning, for performance+reliability vs. storage size tradeoffs.

Coty wrote:
I have also seen auto defragment drives that defrag everytime file information is changed (My uncle's clames to do this, he thought it was supper awesome, but I think its a waste and a way to tear up the SSD)
"Auto defragment"? Got any links? If you're talking about TRIM support, that is something quite different than "defragmentation" and, if done correctly by the drive firmware, a large benefit.

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Post 15 Feb 2011, 11:01
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revolution
When all else fails, read the source


Joined: 24 Aug 2004
Posts: 17247
Location: In your JS exploiting you and your system
revolution
I have been looking into using SSDs with encrypted drives. And the result looks like this: It is a bad mixture, don't do it.

Using whole disk encryption on SSDs will defeat the effectiveness of TRIM. And the presence of the swap out sectors for wear levelling can seriously degrade the protection of the encryption and create a risk of data exposure. These problems also exist for container based encryption. And the problem is doubly worse if you are relying upon hidden partitions.

This may or may not affect you, but it is useful to be aware of potential pitfalls in case you are considering using SSDs.
Post 19 Dec 2011, 06:05
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f0dder



Joined: 19 Feb 2004
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f0dder
Some of the SSD controllers have built-in AES-256 anyway - not sure if you can make it wipe if attached to a different disk controller (and boy that'd be dangerous), but it's a 1-second-or-so erase of the encryption key, and nobody's going to get at your data Smile
Post 19 Dec 2011, 06:25
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revolution
When all else fails, read the source


Joined: 24 Aug 2004
Posts: 17247
Location: In your JS exploiting you and your system
revolution
f0dder wrote:
Some of the SSD controllers have built-in AES-256 anyway - not sure if you can make it wipe if attached to a different disk controller (and boy that'd be dangerous), but it's a 1-second-or-so erase of the encryption key, and nobody's going to get at your data Smile
Both HDD and SSD controller have had this for a while. But there is less flexibility this way and the most damning is that the data enters and leaves the disk in the clear.
Post 19 Dec 2011, 06:51
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Matrix



Joined: 04 Sep 2004
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Matrix
revolution wrote:
SSDs have wear-levelling to even out the wear. Most also have internal RAM to buffer data before writing. Both of these mechanisms increase the expected lifetime of the SSD. But check before you buy if it has both of these things.

SSDs are much more expensive per byte than HDDs, but their performance is much better.

Choose any two: Fast - cheap - long life


ok i choose fast&long_life
Post 19 Dec 2011, 15:12
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