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r22



Joined: 27 Dec 2004
Posts: 805
r22
@pal
I think that excerpt from Wikipedia is an example of creative editing (without credible sources)
Quote:
* 10 bits: deckle, dyme bag

dyme bag is suspicious since it's a drug reference.

Excluding: crumb, quad and nibble, I don't recall seeing any of the others. Not to say they don't exist but some of them seem pretty obscure/fake.

But I don't have much experience with
Quote:
(on a 36-bit machine)
either Razz
Post 28 May 2009, 14:59
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pal



Joined: 26 Aug 2008
Posts: 227
pal
Yeah Wink I guessed some were made up. E.g. a sniff = 1 bit. Why not just call it a bit...
Post 28 May 2009, 15:39
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Borsuc



Joined: 29 Dec 2005
Posts: 2466
Location: Bucharest, Romania
Borsuc
What? bytes larger/smaller than 8 bits are still in use today?
Post 28 May 2009, 23:33
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Tomasz Grysztar
Assembly Artist


Joined: 16 Jun 2003
Posts: 7724
Location: Kraków, Poland
Tomasz Grysztar
r22 wrote:
I think that excerpt from Wikipedia is an example of creative editing (without credible sources)

Hmmm... Following the reference it used I finally landed here:
http://www.science.uva.nl/~mes/jargon/
And it does much better in specifying the sources, eg.:
Jargon File 4.2.0, dated Jan 31, 2000 wrote:
deckle: /dek'l/ n. [from dec- and nybble; the original spelling seems to have been `decle'] Two nickles; 10 bits. Reported among developers for Mattel's GI 1600 (the Intellivision games processor), a chip with 16-bit-wide RAM but 10-bit-wide ROM. See nybble for other such terms.
Jargon File 4.2.0, dated Jan 31, 2000 wrote:
chawmp: n. [University of Florida] 16 or 18 bits (half of a machine word). This term was used by FORTH hackers during the late 1970s/early 1980s; it is said to have been archaic then, and may now be obsolete. It was coined in revolt against the promiscuous use of `word' for anything between 16 and 32 bits; `word' has an additional special meaning for FORTH hacks that made the overloading intolerable. For similar reasons, /gaw'bl/ (spelled `gawble' or possibly `gawbul') was in use as a term for 32 or 48 bits (presumably a full machine word, but our sources are unclear on this). These terms are more easily understood if one thinks of them as faithful phonetic spellings of `chomp' and `gobble' pronounced in a Florida or other Southern U.S. dialect. For general discussion of similar terms, see nybble.
Jargon File 4.2.0, dated Jan 31, 2000 wrote:
dynner: /din'r/ n. 32 bits, by analogy with nybble and byte. Usage: rare and extremely silly. See also playte, tayste, crumb. General discussion of such terms is under nybble.

And if you finally look into that nybble entry, you find the source for the most of that section of wikipedia article.

The "dyme bag" and "sniff" are not listed there, however - perhaps that's the part of "creative editing".
Post 29 May 2009, 04:15
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pal



Joined: 26 Aug 2008
Posts: 227
pal
Borsuc wrote:
What? bytes larger/smaller than 8 bits are still in use today?


I don't think any are still in use today, but I am not sure. Someone else would have to verify, but I know there used to be some architectures with 9 and 16 bit bytes.
Post 29 May 2009, 07:47
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r22



Joined: 27 Dec 2004
Posts: 805
r22
*** More obscure bit number nicknames ***

The PRYT and it follows the prime numbers.

Usage Reference1: Bored ASM programmer was disheartened by the lack of ambiguity in current obscure naming conventions for 'bit counts'.

Usage Reference2: Encryption/Hashing algorithms where logical bitwise shifts, rotations, and XORs are done using prime numbers. "First you shift the register right by a bipryt then xor it with a copy shifted left by a pentapryt."

Pryt = 2 bits
Bipryt = 3
Tripryt = 5
Quadpryt/Quadrapryt = 7
Pentapryt = 11
Hexapryt = 13
Septapryt = 17
Octapryt = 19
et al.

Be sure to reference this post when editing Wikipedia Very Happy
Post 29 May 2009, 13:46
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bitRAKE



Joined: 21 Jul 2003
Posts: 2915
Location: [RSP+8*5]
bitRAKE
Clearly, these other size names came from cat programmers:
Image
Post 29 May 2009, 14:29
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pal



Joined: 26 Aug 2008
Posts: 227
pal
r22, but what is 9 and 15 bits called?

You did just make them up right Wink
Post 29 May 2009, 15:06
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Borsuc



Joined: 29 Dec 2005
Posts: 2466
Location: Bucharest, Romania
Borsuc
pal wrote:
r22, but what is 9 and 15 bits called?
They aren't prime numbers.

_________________
Previously known as The_Grey_Beast
Post 29 May 2009, 15:16
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pal



Joined: 26 Aug 2008
Posts: 227
pal
Oops, I guess I should have read the whole post.
Post 29 May 2009, 17:23
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