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drhowarddrfine



Joined: 10 Jul 2007
Posts: 535
drhowarddrfine
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- What are your favourite tools (operating system, programming/scripting language, text editor, version control system, shell, database engine, other tools you can’t live without) and why do you like them more than others?

Steve Yegge:

OS: Unix! I use linux, cygwin, and darwin all about equally often now. You just can’t beat it for productivity tools. Every programmer should learn how to use every tool in /bin and /usr/bin.
Post 26 Apr 2009, 22:36
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LocoDelAssembly
Your code has a bug


Joined: 06 May 2005
Posts: 4633
Location: Argentina
LocoDelAssembly
This Steve Yegge?

My quote:

Quote:
- If you had three months to learn one relativly new technology, which one would You choose?

Linus Torvalds:

Hmm. I’d really love to do FPGA’s, but I’ve always been too busy to really sit down and start learning. I love the notion of playing with hardware: it’s obviously one of the reasons I ended up doing operating systems, since that (along with compilers) is about as close as you can get to playing with the hardware, without actually designing or building it yourself.
Very Happy
Post 26 Apr 2009, 22:48
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Borsuc



Joined: 29 Dec 2005
Posts: 2466
Location: Bucharest, Romania
Borsuc
Time for me to answer most of them Wink

- How did you learn programming? Were any schools of any use? Or maybe you didn’t even bother with ending any schools Smile ?

All by myself. This includes basic OS programming, sound and signal processing, 3D rendering and physics, compression analysis and algorithm design, and of course, heavy optimization Very Happy.

- What do you think is the most important skill every programmer should posses?

Well some people say I have autism so this could be biased, but I think the single most important process when programming or designing new methods or algorithms is how you imagine the thing. I used to have extreme difficulties with learning pointers back when I was 14 I guess. I then started to think of them as pointers from a 'memory cube' and arrows that pointed to another 'cube'. This worked for a while, after I went deeper into C.

Yes you have to take it step by step. Now I think of "hex memory" (aka the real deal) when imagining data or memory (even the stack). I also think a lot in assembly even when I write C, and how the compiler might optimize itself, and how I could give it some hints or help on that. (I also inspect the result listing sometimes Wink).

- What do you think will be the next big thing in computer programming? X-oriented programming, y language, quantum computers, what?

An AI Razz

- If you had three months to learn one relativly new technology, which one would You choose?

In 3 months? Just one? Wink

- What are your favourite tools (operating system, programming/scripting language, text editor, version control system, shell, database engine, other tools you can’t live without) and why do you like them more than others?

Too many tools to list.
And I like them cause I got used to them. 'nuff said.

- What is your favourite book related to computer programming?

I mostly read various articles rather than books, so my answer would be very biased. In effect, last book I actually read about programming was "Art of Assembly Language Programming" by Randall Hyde. I still think it was a very good read, and I whole-heartedly recommend it, even if it's old (the DOS version I mean), it's the fundamentals that are important!

- What is Your favourite book NOT related to computer programming?

No idea. Can't pick tbh. I like fantasy though -- and I mean, "Lord of the Rings"-type of fantasy.

- What are your favourite music bands/performers/compositors?

Deep and lush film and video game soundtracks. Any composer that manages to make it emotionally deep or epically deep wins my vote. No, this doesn't mean all of them, I find many that don't, who make more 'classical' music, which I don't like (I find it boring, but obviously not as bad as rap or trash metal, which are noise in my opinion!).

For example, call me weird, but I don't particularly like Jerry Goldsmith or John Williams. Even though Williams has few films that he has scored deep, most of his music is kinda boring and chaotic on others. And too simple, not lush or epic or emotionally deep. (this includes Star Wars, yeah shoot me Razz)

With that said I also listen to pop sometimes (the classic pop, not the techno-shit).
Post 26 Apr 2009, 23:58
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drhowarddrfine



Joined: 10 Jul 2007
Posts: 535
drhowarddrfine
LocoDelAssembly wrote:
This Steve Yegge?
There's more than one?
Post 27 Apr 2009, 02:35
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LocoDelAssembly
Your code has a bug


Joined: 06 May 2005
Posts: 4633
Location: Argentina
LocoDelAssembly
I don't know, the name sounded familiar to me but yet I didn't know who he was.
Post 27 Apr 2009, 04:27
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HyperVista



Joined: 18 Apr 2005
Posts: 691
Location: Virginia, USA
HyperVista
And he's not biased in any way at all.... Wink

Related:
Quote:
“There are two major products that come out of Berkeley: LSD and UNIX. We don’t believe this to be a coincidence.”
(Jeremy S. Anderson)
Razz

Borsuc - Brilliant! Nice laugh of the day. Thanks.
Post 27 Apr 2009, 14:07
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